Tools of War

In order to play a battle of Warhammer 40,000: Kill Team, each player will need a collection of Citadel miniatures. They will also need their miniatures’ accompanying rules, known as a faction army list, which can be found in various Warhammer 40,000: Kill Team publications.

You will also need a set of combat gauges, a killzone and some dice. You may also find it helpful to have tokens to use when your miniatures have acted, taken wounds or performed certain special actions during the game.

Operatives and Kill Teams

The Citadel miniatures that a player uses in Warhammer 40,000: Kill Team are known as operatives. Your operatives are known as ‘friendly’ operatives and your opponent’s operatives are known as ‘enemy’ operatives.

When you select your operatives for a battle, you are not selecting individuals, but rather a specialist squad that works together. This is known as your Kill Team. A list of the Kill Teams available to you can be found in your faction’s army list. In battle, all your friendly operatives are collectively referred to as your Kill Team.

Once you have selected your way to play, its mission sequence will tell you when you must select a Kill Team for a battle. When you do, you must select one of the Kill Teams from your faction’s army list, then select the operatives as specified by that Kill Team. Some Kill Teams will specify the exact configuration of operatives it consists of. Others will allow you to select your own configuration of operatives (with restrictions). In either case, the final configuration of operatives must conform to the requirements laid out by that Kill Team.

Distances

Warhammer 40,000: Kill Team captures the tactical engagement of elite operatives by using a collection of combat gauges listed below to measure distances. Similarly, the tense and timely actions of operatives is often displayed in increments. Players can use a tape measure or other measuring device if they wish by converting the relevant distance below into inches, however the game is designed for and explained with graded distances.

The triangle distance is 1".

The circle is 2".

The square is 3".

The pentagon is 6".

Any distances of a symbol without a numerical value correspond to one combat gauge, e.g. . Multiple combat gauge distances will be specified with a numerical value, e.g. 2.

Distances can be measured at any time, and can be measured out in different increments, so long as the total does not exceed the specified distance. For example, if an operative is going to be moved a distance of 3. This can be measured out as , 6, or even .

Many rules, such as a Normal Move or ability, will have a distance requirement. When measuring distances to and from operatives, measure from the closest part of the bases of operatives, rather than the miniature.

If a rule states that something must be ‘within’ a certain range, it is in range if the closest part of its base is no more than the specified distance. If a rule states something must be ‘wholly within’ a certain range, it is in range if every part of its base is no more than the specified distance. An operative is always within and wholly within range of itself.

Killzones

A killzone is the playing area in which your operatives wage war. Games of Warhammer 40,000: Kill Team are designed to be played on a 30" by 22" area, which is the size of a kill team gameboard. A killzone will also contain various terrain features that add excitement and tactical depth to your games. Terrain is explained in more detail here.

Dice

Warhammer 40,000: Kill Team uses six-sided dice (D6). Rolling a dice will give you a value, known as the result, which will determine the success or failure of your operatives’ deeds. Some rules refer to a D3. In such cases, roll one D6 and halve the value (rounding fractions up) to determine the result.

Many rules require a certain result to succeed, such as attacking. For example, to make a successful roll, you might need a 3+. This means the result must be three or higher to succeed, so a dice roll value of 3, 4, 5 or 6 succeeds, whereas a dice roll value of 1 or 2 fails.

Some rules allow you to re-roll a dice roll. You can never re-roll a dice more than once, and you cannot select the original result, even if the new result is worse.

Some rules instruct players to roll off. To do so, both players roll one D6, and whoever scores highest wins the roll-off. If there is a tie for the highest roll, make the roll-off again. If both players would use a rule that would allow them to re-roll their dice when rolling off, both players must declare the use of this rule before any dice are re-rolled, starting with the player who lost the roll off.

Some rare rules will modify the result of a roll by adding or subtracting from the result. All modifiers are cumulative. A dice result can be modified above or below the maximum or minimum possible value of the roll. For example, if a D6 value is 6 and you must add 1 to the result, the final result is a 7.

Datacards

Each operative in your Kill Team has its own set of individual rules known as a datacard. It states all the key characteristics of your operatives and the weapons they are equipped with, and details anything unique they can do. You will find an example datacard and details of what information it provides below. All of the terms below are then explained in this section.



1. Operative Type

The type of the operative.

2. Physical Profile

  • Movement (M): The speed at which the operative moves across the killzone, represented by a distance value.
  • Action Point Limit (APL): The number of action points an operative generates when it is activated, which are used to perform actions.
  • Group Activation (GA): Most operatives are activated individually, but some operatives must be activated in a group. This number states how many of these operatives are activated together.
  • Defence (Df): How many attacks the operative can defend each time another operative attacks it with a ranged weapon.
  • Save (Sv): How likely the operative is to avert an attack each time another operative attacks it with a ranged weapon, represented by the result required when rolling a D6. Note that a lower result is a better characteristic.
  • Wounds (W): How many wounds an operative can lose before it is incapacitated. This is explained here.

3. Ranged Weapons Profile

The ranged weapons the operative can be equipped with, and their characteristics and rules when shooting.
  • Name: The name of the weapon.
  • Attacks (A): The number of attack dice to roll when the operative attacks with this weapon.
  • Ballistic Skill (BS): How accurate the operative is when attacking with this weapon, represented by the result required when rolling a D6. Note that a lower result is a better characteristic.
  • Damage (Dmg): The amount of damage each attack dice can inflict. The first value is the Normal Damage characteristic. The second value is the Critical Damage characteristic.
  • Special Rules (SR): Any special rules that apply each time the operative attacks with this weapon. Common special rules are explained here. Special rules marked with a * are explained on the operative’s datacard.
  • Critical Hit Rules (!): Any additional effects the weapon can cause with critical hits.

4. Melee Weapon Profiles

The melee weapons the operative can be equipped with, and their characteristics and rules when fighting in combat.

  • Name: The name of the weapon.
  • Attacks (A): The starting number of attack dice to roll when the operative attacks with this weapon.
  • Weapon Skill (WS): How accurate and skilled the operative is when attacking with this weapon, represented by the result required when rolling a D6. Note that a lower result is a better characteristic.
  • Damage (Dmg): The amount of damage each attack dice can inflict. The first value is the Normal Damage characteristic. The second value is the Critical Damage characteristic.
  • Special Rules (SR): Any special rules that apply each time the operative attacks with this weapon. Common special rules are explained here. Special rules marked with a * are explained on the operative’s datacard.
  • Critical Hit Rules (!): Any additional effects the weapon can cause with critical hits.

5. Abilities

  • Some abilities will only affect operatives with the relevant keywords, as explained below.
  • An operative gains no benefit from the same ability from two different operatives - that ability only applies once.

6. Unique Actions

Any unique actions the operative can perform, in addition to the universal actions available to all operatives. Actions are explained here.

7. Keywords

  • A set of keywords that help to identify the operative.
  • Some rules will only affect operatives with the relevant keyword, identified by the KEYWORD BOLD font. For example, if a rule specifies friendly ADEPTUS ASTARTES PHOBOS operatives, it only affects operatives from your kill team that have both the ADEPTUS ASTARTES and PHOBOS keywords.
  • Some keywords are orange and have a skull symbol, e.g. KOMMANDO. This denotes a faction keyword, which is used for creating a roster (Matched Roster and Narrative Dataslate).
  • Pluralisation of a keyword does not affect which operative the rule applies to.
  • Some operatives have selectable keywords in angular brackets, such as <CHAPTER>. This denotes a keyword that you must choose for yourself when the operative is added to your roster. Your choice replaces all instances of the angular bracket keyword on that operative’s datacard. For example, if you add an ADEPTUS ASTARTES INTERCESSOR to your roster and you choose for it to be from the Dark Angels Chapter, you replace the <CHAPTER> keyword in all instances on that operative’s datacard with the DARK ANGELS keyword.

Engagement Range

Engagement Range is the zone of threat that operatives present to their enemies. Many rules in the game use Engagement Range, such as when moving and fighting. Engagement Range is mutual, therefore operatives are within each other’s Engagement Range if one of them is Visible to and within of the other.

Modifying Characteristics

Some rules will modify the characteristics of an operative and/or their weapons. All modifiers to a characteristic are cumulative.

If a characteristic refers to the result required when rolling a D6 (i.e. Save, Ballistic Skill and Weapon Skill), the modifier will specify to improve or worsen the characteristic. As a lower result is a better characteristic, the modifier should be applied accordingly. For example, if a Ballistic Skill of 4+ is worsened by 1, it would be modified to a 5+.

If an operative’s APL is modified, it lasts until the end of its current or next activation (whichever comes first). Regardless of how many APL modifiers an operative is affected by, the total modification can never be more than -1 or +1 from its normal APL. For example, if an operative has an APL of 2, and two rules say to add 1 to the operative’s APL, until the end of its next activation it would have an APL of 3.

Fire Teams

Many of the kill teams presented in Kill Team: Compendium require you to select your kill team by selecting one or two fire teams. A fire team is a collection of operatives and their selection requirements for the associated kill team. If your kill team consists of two fire teams, you can select the same fire team more than once. Many fire teams have the option to select a LEADER operative. When selecting your kill team, you can only include one LEADER operative, and in matched play, you must include one LEADER operative. Finally, each fire team has one or more archetypes. In such circumstances, your kill team’s overall archetype(s) is the archetype(s) of its fire teams.

Battle Structure

A battle of Warhammer 40,000: Kill Team consists of four Turning Points. A Turning Point includes three phases, each of which must be completed in order and in full. Once all three phases have been completed, the next Turning Point begins, the process repeating until the battle ends at the end of the fourth Turning Point. The three phases are listed in order below, and are explained below.

TURNING POINT
1
INITIATIVE PHASE
In the Initiative phase, the players ready their kill teams and determine who has the initiative for the Turning Point.
2
STRATEGY PHASE
In the Strategy phase, the players generate a valuable but limited resource known as Command Points (CPs) and spend them to use Strategic Ploys. Alternatively, they can save their CPs to spend on Tactical Ploys later in the battle. In addition, players may reveal certain Tac Ops in this phase for their kill teams to attempt.
3
FIREFIGHT PHASE
In the Firefight phase, the players alternate activating operatives or groups of operatives to perform actions with, such as moving around the killzone, shooting the enemy with weapons, fighting in combats or performing unique tasks like planting explosives and manifesting powerful psychic powers.

Initiative Phase

1. Ready Operatives

Each player readies all friendly operatives in the killzone by flipping their order token so they show an operative as ready.

2. Determine Initiative

The players determine who has the initiative for the Turning Point. During the first Turning Point, initiative is determined in the mission sequence of your type of play. In subsequent Turning Points, the players roll off and the winner decides who has the initiative, but if the result of the roll off is a tie, the player who did not have initiative in the previous Turning Point has the initiative. Use the initiative token as a reminder of who has the initiative.

Having the initiative will give a player influence over the order of certain aspects of the battle, such as deciding which operative activates first during the Turning Point. If more than one rule would happen simultaneously, for example two rules that take effect at the end of a Turning Point, the player with the initiative determines the order in which they take effect.

Strategy Phase

1. Generate Command Points

Each player generates 1 Command Point (CP) and adds it to their CP pool. CPs remain in a player’s pool until they are spent.

CPs can be spent on Strategic Ploys. They are used in the Strategy phase as described below, and are unique rules a cunning general can use to aid their kill team. Strategic Ploys can be found in your faction’s army list.

CPs can also be spent on Tactical Ploys. It will specify when they should be used. Tactical Ploys are minor benefits that can have significant effects if used at the right time. Other than Command Re-roll below, each player can use each Tactical Ploy no more than once per Turning Point. If a Tactical Ploy is not used during a Turning Point, it is only limited by the number of Command Points you have. Tactical Ploys can be found in your faction’s army list. In addition, the Command Re-roll Tactical Ploy is available to all factions.

COMMAND RE-ROLL1CP
Tactical Ploy
Use this Tactical Ploy after rolling one of your attack dice or defence dice. You can re-roll that dice.

2. Play Strategic Ploys

Starting with the player who has initiative, each player alternates either using a Strategic Ploy or choosing to pass. The players repeat this process until they have both passed in succession.

If a player declares they are going to use a Strategic Ploy, they must first pay its CP cost by removing the specified CPs from their pool. If a player does not have enough CPs to pay the cost, they cannot use that Strategic Ploy. When a Strategic Ploy is used, resolve its effects immediately before alternating to the other player. Each player cannot use the same Strategic Ploy more than once during each Strategy phase.

3. Target Reveal

Starting with the player who has initiative, the players alternate revealing Tac Ops that may be revealed in the Target Reveal step of this Turning Point, or choosing to pass. Note that players do not have to reveal a Tac Op, but some must be revealed in certain Turning Points in order to be achieved. The players repeat this process until they have both passed in succession.

Tac Ops are tactical operations - selectable secondary objectives available to you in certain ways to play. Tac Ops are explained here.

Firefight Phase

1. Perform Actions

The player who has initiative activates first. They select one ready friendly operative and activates it. Once they have completed that operative’s activation, their opponent selects one of their ready operatives and does the same. The players repeat this process until all operatives in the killzone have been activated.

If an operative has a Group Activation of more than 1, it must be activated in a group, rather than individually. In such cases the player selects one friendly ready operative and activates it. When that operative’s activation ends, they then select another ready friendly operative of the same type to be activated. They repeat this process until they have activated the number of operatives specified by that operative’s Group Activation characteristic, or there are no more friendly operatives of that type left to activate. Their opponent then activates one of their operatives as normal.

Each time a player activates one of their ready operatives, they must determine whether it has the Engage or Conceal order. If it is the first Turning Point, it has the order that was given to it when it was set up before the battle. In all subsequent Turning Points, they can choose what order to give it.

In the right circumstances, an operative with the Conceal order is not a valid target for an enemy operative’s shooting attacks (as explained here), but it is unable to perform various actions. An operative with the Engage order can perform more actions, but is more susceptible to enemy operatives’ ranged attacks. Each time you give an operative an order, place the relevant order token next to them.

The operative then generates a number of action points equal to its Action Point Limit (APL), which are used to perform actions. Once all their action points have been used and they have no other actions to perform, their activation ends and they are no longer ready.

When an operative’s activation ends, flip their order token to the activated side to signify they are no longer ready.


Each action has an associated cost in action points, e.g. 1AP. Each time a player wishes to perform an action with an operative, they must subtract the specified action points from the number of action points that operative generated for that activation. If they do not have enough action points to perform that action, they must select a different action. They then perform that action as specified. While an operative is performing an action, it is known as the active operative.

The controlling player does not need to declare all of their operative’s actions when it is activated. Instead, they can perform an action, and then decide the next action after seeing its effects. Unless otherwise specified, an operative cannot perform the same action more than once during its activation.


Overwatch

When it is your turn to activate an operative, if you do not have any ready operatives left to activate, but your opponent has not yet activated all of their operatives, you can select a friendly operative that has an Engage order and has already activated this phase to perform a single Overwatch action. Each operative can perform one Overwatch action per Turning Point, and you can only select an operative to do so if your opponent still has operatives left to activate. That means that once your opponent has activated all their operatives, the Firefight phase ends.

Actions

Actions are categorised as follows:
  • Universal actions can be performed by all operatives. They are detailed below.
  • Unique actions are actions detailed on an operative’s datacard that only they can perform, such as the Dakka Dash action found on the example datacard.
  • Mission actions are specific to the mission you are playing, and will be detailed by that mission’s briefing. Missions can be found here (Open Play mission) and here (Spec Ops Narrative missions).
  • Free actions can only be performed when another rule specifies. Each time an operative would perform a free action, the following rules apply.
    • The operative can perform the action, so long as the requirements of the action are met.
    • The player does not subtract any additional AP to perform the action.
    • The operative would still count as performing the action for all rules purposes. For example, if it performed it during its activation, it would not be able to perform the action again during that activation.

For example, when a KOMMANDO DAKKA BOY performs a Dakka Dash action (see unique actions, above), it can perform a free Dash and free Shoot action without subtracting any additional AP (other than the AP spent on the Dakka Dash action). However, it is subject to those actions’ requirements, therefore it cannot perform the free Dash action if it is within Engagement Range of enemy operatives, and cannot perform the free Shoot action if it is within Engagement Range of enemy operatives or has a Conceal order. In addition, for each of the free actions it performs, it cannot perform them again during its activation.

Normal Move1AP

Move the active operative up to a distance that does not exceed its Movement characteristic. Remember that distances can be broken down into smaller increments, so long as the total distance the operative moves does not exceed its Movement characteristic. The operative must move in straight-line increments each time it moves in a direction. An increment of movement can be less than , but such increments are still treated as .

The operative must finish the move in a location it can be placed. If this is not possible, it cannot move there. It cannot move over the edge of the killzone or through any part of another operative’s base, and it cannot move within Engagement Range of an enemy operative, unless another friendly operative is already within Engagement Range of that enemy operative, in which case it cannot finish its move within Engagement Range of that enemy operative.

An operative cannot move through terrain features - it must traverse or climb over them. If an operative wishes to move across the killzone by jumping across gaps or down from ledges, it must jump or drop.

An operative cannot perform this action if it is within Engagement Range of an enemy operative. In addition, an operative cannot perform this action in the same activation in which it performed the Fall Back or Charge action.

Fly

Each time an operative makes any kind of move, if it has the FLY keyword, it can move around, across and over other operatives (and their bases) as if they were not there, but must finish its move following all requirements specified by that move, and cannot finish its move on top of other operatives (or their bases).

  1. The operative’s M characteristic is 3. It first moves in a straight line increment of to clear the corner of a wall.
  2. It then moves in a straight line increment of 2, the remaining distance it can move without exceeding its M characteristic.
  1. The operative’s M characteristic is 3. It intends to stay close to the wall, therefore its movement will be measured out in different increments without exceeding its M characteristic. It first moves in a straight line increment of less than , but as the minimum increment of movement is , it is still treated as a movement of .
  2. It then moves in a straight line increment of 2.
  3. Finally, the operative wants to be at the corner of the wall. Its final increment of movement is less than , but as before, this is rounded up to . The operative’s final distance of movement is 2 and 2.

Charge1AP

Move the active operative following the same rules as a Normal Move action with the following exceptions:
  • Move the active operative up to a distance that does not exceed the distance equal to its Movement characteristic plus .
  • It must finish the move within Engagement Range of an enemy operative. If this is not possible you must choose a different action for the operative (the action points subtracted for the Charge action are refunded).
  • If it moves within Engagement Range of an enemy operative, if no other friendly operatives are within Engagement Range of that enemy operative, it must finish the move within Engagement Range of that enemy operative.
An operative cannot perform this action if it has the Conceal order or if it is within Engagement Range of enemy operatives. In addition, an operative cannot perform this action in the same activation in which it performed the Normal Move, Dash or Fall Back action.

  1. Operative A wants to charge operative E. It first moves within Engagement Range of operative C. As operative C is within Engagement Range of operative B, operative A is free to continue.
  2. It then moves within Engagement Range of operative D. As operative D is not within Engagement Range of any other friendly operatives, operative A must now finish the move within Engagement Range of operative D.
  3. However, as operative A still has movement remaining, it can still move within Engagement Range of operative E, so long as it still finishes the move within Engagement Range of operative D.

Fall Back2AP

Move the active operative following the same rules as a Normal Move action with the following exceptions:
  • It can only perform this action if it is within Engagement Range of an enemy operative.
  • It can move within Engagement Range of enemy operatives, but cannot finish the move within Engagement Range of an enemy operative. If this is not possible, it cannot perform this action (the action points subtracted for the Fall Back action are refunded).
An operative cannot perform this action in the same activation in which it performed the Normal Move or Charge action.

Operative A is performing a Fall Back action. It can move within Engagement Range of operative B, and can move within Engagement Range of operative C, but cannot finish the move within Engagement Range of operative B or C, as it cannot finish the move within Engagement Range of an enemy operative.

Dash1AP

Move the active operative following the same rules as a Normal Move action with the following exception:
  • It can only move up to .
An operative cannot perform this action if it is within Engagement Range of an enemy operative. In addition, an operative cannot perform this action in the same activation in which it performed a Charge action.

Pass1AP

No rules effect for the active operative. This action is used if the player wishes to do nothing more with their operative, but they have action points remaining. Unlike other actions, operatives can perform this action more than once during their activation.

Overwatch0AP

Make a shooting attack with one of the active operative’s ranged weapons. For that shooting attack, worsen the Ballistic Skill characteristic of the active operative’s ranged weapons by 1.

An operative cannot perform this action if it is within Engagement Range of an enemy operative. In addition, an operative can only perform this action once per Turning Point, only if it has an Engage order, and only as explained by Overwatch here.

Pick Up1AP

To perform this action, an operative must be within of an objective marker or token that the Pick Up action can be performed upon. Remove that objective marker or token from the killzone; the acting operative is now carrying it. While an operative is carrying an objective marker or token, it is always in control of it, and unless otherwise specified, acts normally.

An operative can drop an objective marker or token it is carrying at any point during its activation without subtracting any additional AP. If an operative would be removed from the killzone while carrying an objective marker or token, before it is removed, it must drop it. To drop an objective marker or token, the operative’s controlling player places the centre of it within of and Visible to the operative. If that is not possible, they must place it in a location that is Visible and as close as possible to the operative.

An operative cannot perform the Pick Up action if it is within Engagement Range of an enemy operative, if it does not control that objective marker or token, or if it is already carrying another objective marker or token.

Shoot1AP

Make a shooting attack with one of the active operative’s ranged weapons. An operative cannot perform this action if it has a Conceal order or if it is within Engagement Range of an enemy operative. To make a shooting attack, complete the shooting sequence as follows:

In the shooting sequence, the player controlling the active operative is the attacker. The player controlling the target operative is the defender.

1. Select Ranged Weapon

The attacker selects one ranged weapon their operative is equipped with and collects their attack dice. Their attack dice are a number of D6 equal to the weapon’s Attacks characteristic.

2. Select Valid Target

The attacker selects a valid target for the shooting attack. A valid target is an enemy operative in the active operative’s Line of Sight that has no friendly operatives within its Engagement Range. If there are no valid targets for the shooting attack, the Shoot action cannot be resolved and you must choose a different action for the operative (the action points subtracted for the Shoot action would be refunded). If there are no valid targets for the shooting attack, the Shoot action cannot be resolved and you must choose a different action for the operative (the action points spent on the Shoot action would be refunded).

3. Roll Attack Dice

The attacker rolls their attack dice. Each result that equals or beats the selected weapon’s Ballistic Skill characteristic is a successful hit and is retained. Each that doesn’t is a failed hit and is discarded. A result of 6 is always a successful hit and a result of 1 is always a failed hit. Keep track of each retained result of 6 - this is a critical hit. Each other retained success is a normal hit.

Critical hits are well-placed or well-timed attacks. They often have unique effects, such as inflicting additional damage or being harder to defend against. This will be shown in the weapon’s Damage, Critical Hit Rules and any Special Rules it has.

4. Roll Defence Dice

The defender collects their defence dice and rolls them. Their defence dice are a number of D6 equal to the target’s Defence characteristic. Each result that equals or beats the target’s Save characteristic is a successful save and is retained. Each that doesn’t is a failed save and is discarded. A result of 1 is always a failed save. Keep track of each retained result of 6 - this is a critical save. Each other retained success is a normal save.

Critical saves are well-timed dodges, esoteric protection or lucky escapes. They are used to avoid critical hits.

If the target is in Cover, before rolling their defence dice, the defender can retain one as a successful normal save without rolling it.

Some weapons have Special Rules that affect dice during an attack, such as Armour Penetration. Common Special Rules can be found here, and more unique ones will be found in the relevant army list.

5. Resolve Successful Saves

The defender resolves all of their successful saves. To resolve a successful save, they select one or more of their retained defence dice, discard one of the attacker’s successful hits, then discard that defence dice.
  • If the defence dice they select is a normal save, they select one of their opponent’s normal hits to be discarded.
  • If the defence dice they select are two normal saves, they select one of their opponent’s critical hits to be discarded.
  • If the defence dice they select is a critical save, they select one of their opponent’s normal hits or critical hits to be discarded.

6. Resolve Successful Hits

The attacker resolves any remaining successful hits. To resolve a successful hit, they select one of their retained attack dice, inflict damage on the target, then discard that attack dice.
  • If the attack dice they select is a normal hit, inflict damage equal to the weapon’s Normal Damage.
  • If the attack dice they select is a critical hit, inflict damage equal to the weapon’s Critical Damage.

7. Remove Incapacitated Operatives

Any operatives that were incapacitated are removed from the killzone after the active operative has finished making all of its shooting attacks for that action. That means that in the rare instance that an operative is attacking multiple targets (e.g. the weapon has the Blast special rule), they make all of their attacks for that action before any incapacitated operatives are removed.



  1. The Veteran Guardsman makes a shooting attack. The attacker, the Veteran Guardsman’s controlling player, selects the Veteran Guardsman’s lasgun as the ranged weapon to make the shooting attack with and collects four attack dice. They then select the Kommando as the target.

  2. The attacker rolls their attack dice and the results are as follows:


    The result of 2 is discarded as it does not equal or beat the weapon’s BS characteristic, and the rest are retained as successful hits.

  3. The defender, the Kommando’s controlling player, collects and rolls their defence dice and the results are as follows:


    The results of 1 and 3 are discarded as they do not equal or beat the Kommando’s Sv characteristic, and the result of 5 is retained as a successful save.

  4. The defender resolves their successful saves. As the retained defence dice is a normal save, they select one of the attacker’s normal hits (a result of 4) to be discarded. They now have no remaining defence dice.


  5. The attacker resolves their remaining successful hits.


    The first retained attack dice they resolve is a critical hit (the result of 6), therefore they inflict Critical Damage on the Kommando. The remaining retained attack dice they resolve is a normal hit (the result of 4), therefore they inflict Normal Damage on the Kommando. They now have no remaining attack dice and the Kommando has lost a total of 5 wounds.

Fight1AP

Fight in combat with the active operative against an enemy operative. An operative cannot perform this action unless it is within Engagement Range of an enemy operative. To fight in combat, complete the fight sequence as follows:

In the fight sequence, the player controlling the active operative is the attacker. The player controlling the target operative is the defender.

1. Select Valid Target

The attacker selects a valid target for combat. A valid target is an enemy operative in the active operative’s Engagement Range. The rules for determining if the target operative is Visible can be found here. If there are no valid targets for combat, the Fight action cannot be resolved and you must choose a different action for the operative (the action points subtracted for the Fight action are refunded).

2. Select Melee Weapons

The attacker selects one melee weapon their operative is equipped with and collects their attack dice. The defender then selects one melee weapon their operative is equipped with and collects their attack dice. Each player’s attack dice are a number of D6 equal to their selected weapon’s Attacks characteristic.

3. Roll Attack Dice

Both players roll their attack dice simultaneously. Each result that equals or beats their selected weapon’s Weapon Skill characteristic is a successful hit and is retained. Each that doesn't is a failed hit and is discarded. A result of 6 is always a successful hit and a result of 1 is always a failed hit. Keep track of each retained result of 6 - this is a critical hit. Each other retained success is a normal hit.

4. Resolve Successful Hits

Starting with the attacker, each player alternates resolving one of their successful hits. They repeat this process until one operative in that combat is incapacitated or they have no more hits to resolve, in which case their opponent resolves all of their remaining hits. To resolve a successful hit, they select one of their retained attack dice, choose for their operative to strike or parry, then discard that attack dice.

If they parry, one of their opponent’s successful hits is discarded.
  • If the attack dice they select is a normal hit, they select one of their opponent’s normal hits to be discarded.
  • If the attack dice they select is a critical hit, they select one of their opponent’s normal hits or critical hits to be discarded.
If they strike, inflict damage on the target.
  • If the attack dice they select is a normal hit, inflict damage equal to their selected weapon’s Normal Damage.
  • If the attack dice they select is a critical hit, inflict damage equal to their selected weapon’s Critical Damage.

Combat Support

Each time an operative fights in combat, for each other friendly operative that supports them in that combat, improve the Weapon Skill characteristic of melee weapons they are equipped with by 1 for that combat. For a friendly operative to support them, it must be within Engagement Range of the enemy operative in that combat and not within Engagement Range of other enemy operatives.


1. The Kommando fights in combat. The attacker, the Kommando’s controlling player, selects the Veteran Guardsman as the target. The attacker selects the Kommando’s choppa as the melee weapon to fight in the combat with and collects four attack dice. The defender, the Veteran Guardsman’s controlling player, then selects the Veteran Guardsman’s bayonet and collects three attack dice.

2. The attacker and defender roll their attack dice simultaneously. The attacker rolls:


The results of 1 and 2 are discarded as they do not equal or beat the weapon’s WS characteristic, and the rest are retained as successful hits.

The defender rolls:


The result of 1 is discarded as it does not equal or beat the weapon’s WS characteristic, and the rest are retained as successful hits.

3. The attacker resolves a successful hit first. They select their attack dice result of 6 and choose to parry. As the retained attack dice is a critical hit, they select their opponent’s critical hit to be discarded. The defender then resolves a successful hit. They select their attack dice result of 4 and choose to strike. As the retained attack dice is a normal hit, they inflict Normal Damage on the Kommando. The attacker’s remaining attack dice is now...


...and the defender has no remaining attack dice:


4. The attacker resolves a successful hit again. They select their remaining attack dice result of 4 and choose to strike. As the retained attack dice is a normal hit, they Inflict Normal Damage on the Veteran Guardsman. Both players now have no remaining attack dice. The Veteran Guardsman operative has lost a total of 4 wounds and the Kommando operative has lost a total of 2 wounds.

Operative C and operative B are fighting in a combat. As operative A is within Engagement Range of operative B and not within Engagement Range of other enemy operatives, the WS characteristic of operative C’s melee weapons are improved by 1 for that combat.
Operative C and operative B are fighting in a combat. As operative A and operative D are within Engagement Range of operative B and not within Engagement Range of other enemy operatives, the WS characteristic of operative C’s melee weapons are improved by 2 for that combat. As operative E is within Engagement Range of operative C and not within Engagement Range of other enemy operatives, the WS characteristic of operative B’s melee weapons are improved by 1 for that combat.

Wounds and Damage

All operatives have a starting number of wounds that are used to measure how much damage they can sustain before losing effectiveness and becoming incapacitated. Each time damage is inflicted on an operative, it loses a number of wounds equal to the value of that damage.

If an operative’s wounds are reduced to 0 or less, it is incapacitated. When an operative is incapacitated, it is removed from the killzone and you can no longer use its abilities. If an operative is incapacitated during a shooting sequence, it is removed after all shooting attacks from that action have been made, as specified in the shooting sequence. If an operative is incapacitated during a fight sequence, any remaining hits are discarded and not resolved.

Certain objectives and Tac Ops will require friendly operatives to incapacitate enemy operatives, and may even specify the manner in which it must be done (e.g. a shooting attack). This is achieved when a friendly operative performs an action or ability (or, where necessary, the specified action or ability), and as a result of doing so, an enemy operative is incapacitated.

Some rules inflict mortal wounds. Mortal wounds are a powerful source of damage such that rolling defence dice will not help the operative defend against them. Each time an operative suffers a mortal wound, one point of damage is applied to it.

If an operative has fewer than half of its wounds remaining, it is injured. While an operative is injured, subtract from its Movement characteristic and worsen the Ballistic Skill and Weapon Skill characteristics of the ranged and melee weapons it is equipped with by 1 respectively.

It is a good idea to mark any lost wounds so that both players can keep track of the damage dealt. Some players will place dice or tokens next to the operative or on its datacard, while others may choose to write it down on a piece of paper.


Controlling Objective Markers and Tokens

Your operatives will most often be battling for dominance of vital objective markers and tokens. Many rules will require your operatives to control objective markers or tokens in order to interact with them. Friendly operatives control an objective marker or token if the total APL characteristic of friendly operatives within of the centre of it is greater than that of enemy operatives. If an operative is carrying an objective marker or token (see the Pick Up action), it is always in control of it. Finally, unless otherwise specified, when setting up or measuring a distance to an objective marker or token, always measure from its centre.

Operative A is within of the centre of the objective marker for a total APL of 2. Operative B and C are within of the centre of the objective marker for a total APL of 4. Therefore operative B and C control the objective marker.

The locations of objective markers on the battlefield are typically shown on the deployment map of the mission being played, and are represented by the icon above.

Line of Sight

Some rules will require an operative (known as the intended target in the following rules) to be in the active operative’s Line of Sight (LoS), such as when selecting a valid target for a shooting attack.

If the intended target has an Engage order, it is in the active operative’s LoS if it is:

1. Visible.
2. Not Obscured.

If the intended target has a Conceal order, it is in the active operative’s LoS if it is:

1. Visible
2. Not Obscured
3. Not in Cover.

Visible

For an intended target to be Visible, the following must be true:
  • You can draw an imaginary, unobstructed straight line (known as a Visibility line) 1 mm wide from the head of the active operative’s miniature to any part of the miniature of the intended target (not its base).
In the rare instance that bases prevent an intended target from being Visible to the active operative, such as when the active operative is directly below or above the intended target, treat those bases as being invisible.

Some rare rules will require you to select a point that is Visible (e.g. a point on the killzone). In such circumstances, you must be able to draw an imaginary, unobstructed straight line 1mm wide from the head of the active operative’s miniature to the point you would select.

Obscured

Regardless of whether a target operative has an Engage or Conceal order, if an Obscuring terrain feature is in the way, an active operative may be unable have LoS to them. For an intended target to be Obscured, the following must be true:
  • The intended target is more than from a point at which a Cover line crosses a terrain feature that is Obscuring (see Terrain Traits). However, if the active operative is within of a point at which a Cover line crosses a terrain feature that is Obscuring, that part of the terrain feature is not treated as Obscuring.

Cover

If an operative positions themselves in Cover, they will use it for protection while they have an Engage order, or hide behind it while they have a Conceal order. For an intended target to be in Cover, both of the following must be true:
  • The intended target is more than from the active operative.
  • The intended target is within of a point at which a Cover line crosses another operative’s base (unless that other operative is not itself in the active operative’s LoS), or a terrain feature that provides Cover (see Terrain Traits).

Note that an intended target that has an Engage order can gain a defensive benefit for being in Cover as specified in the shooting sequence.

To establish Cover lines, the active operative’s controlling player draws imaginary straight lines, 1mm wide, from any part of the active operative’s base to every part of the intended target’s base.

A Kommando with an Engage order is visible to the Veteran Guardsman, but a terrain feature that is Obscuring is between them. The Veteran Guardsman is not within of a point at which a Cover line crosses the terrain feature. The Kommando is more than from a point at which a Cover line crosses the terrain feature. Therefore the Kommando is Obscured. It is not in the Veteran Guardsman’s LoS and Is not a valid target for its shooting attack.

A Kommando with an Engage order is visible to the Veteran Guardsman, but two terrain features that are Obscuring are between them. The Veteran Guardsman is within of a point at which a Cover line crosses one of the terrain features, therefore the Kommando is not Obscured by that terrain feature. The Kommando is not more than from a point at which a Cover line crosses the other terrain feature, therefore the Kommando is not Obscured by that terrain feature either. It is in the Veteran Guardsman’s LoS and is a valid target for its shooting attack.

A Kommando with a Conceal order is visible to the Veteran Guardsman and is not Obscured. The Kommando is both more than from the Veteran Guardsman and within of a point at which a Cover line crosses a terrain feature that provides Cover, therefore it is in Cover. As the Kommando has a Conceal order, it is not in the Veteran Guardsman’s LoS and is not a valid target for its shooting attack.

A Kommando with a Conceal order is visible to the Veteran Guardsman and is not Obscured. The Kommando is more than from the Veteran Guardsman, but not within of a point at which a Cover line crosses a terrain feature that provides Cover, therefore it is not in Cover. It is in the Veteran Guardsman’s LoS and is a valid target for its shooting attack.

Killzones

Killzones are an essential component of Warhammer 40,000: Kill Team, providing an immersive experience as well as an engaging battlefield for your operatives to fight on. Securing objectives, climbing buildings, vaulting obstacles, taking cover and leaping over gaps are all part of mastering the environments your operatives wage war within. In this section you will find all the rules for the features that makes up your killzone, and how your operatives interact with it.


Terrain Traits

Killzones will include a multitude of terrain features for your operatives to fight around, and the various parts of each terrain feature have traits that convey certain rules effects. If you create a killzone using a Killzone Environment, each terrain feature will be built in a specific way and the different parts of it will be defined. If your killzone is of your own devising, you and your opponent must define each part of a terrain feature and its accompanying traits. Examples of how to do this can be found here.

Heavy

Heavy terrain provides Cover and is Obscuring.

Light

Light terrain provides Cover unless otherwise specified (e.g. Vantage Point).

Traversable

Traversable terrain can be traversed.

Insignificant

Insignificant terrain is terrain too small to have an impact on your operatives and provides no rules.

Scalable

This trait can be applied to terrain features more than 2 tall. Each time an operative climbs this terrain feature, the final incremental distance of less than is ignored, instead of being rounded up to .

Barricades

Barricades are terrain that players set up before a battle. They are wide and tall. They are Light and Traversable.


Vantage Point

A Vantage Point is a terrain feature with a vertical element (i.e. a level higher than the floor of the killzone) that operatives can be placed upon. If a part of a terrain feature is not defined as a Vantage Point, operatives can climb over or traverse it, but they cannot finish a move or be set up upon it.

Each time an operative on a Vantage Point makes a shooting attack, each enemy operative that has a Conceal order that is in Cover provided by Light terrain or another operative, and is at least lower than them, is treated as having an Engage order for that attack instead.

Each time a shooting attack is made against an operative on a Vantage Point, for that shooting attack:
  • The operative cannot use the floor of the Vantage Point as Cover or to be Obscured.
  • The operative cannot use parts of the Vantage Point’s terrain feature that is lower than the operative as Cover or to be Obscured.
Instead, the operative must use parts that are the same height as or higher than the operative, such as a rampart or battlement on the Vantage Point.

Vantage Point 1: The Kommando on a Vantage Point makes a shooting attack. The Veteran Guardsman has a Conceal order and is in Cover provided by Light terrain. As it is at least lower than the Kommando, the Veteran Guardsman is treated as having an Engage order for that attack instead, making it a valid target for the shooting attack.

Vantage Point 2: The Veteran Guardsman makes a shooting attack. The Kommando has a Conceal order and is on a Vantage Point, but as it cannot use the floor of the Vantage Point or parts of the Vantage Point that are lower than it as Cover or to be Obscured, it is a valid target for the shooting attack and cannot use the Vantage Point as Cover.

Moving Through Terrain

As your operatives navigate the killzone, terrain features may restrict their movement. To manoeuvre across or over them, your operatives must traverse, climb or jump.

Traverse

A traverse is when an operative must clear a small obstacle in their way such as a barricade or pipe. During an operative’s move, it can ascend and descend terrain with the Traversable trait at a cost of , but cannot finish a move on top of it. If this is not possible, it cannot traverse it - it must move around it instead. Note that a traverse is not a climb - the operative simply vaults over the obstacle in their way as it moves horizontally across the killzone.

The operative has a M characteristic of 3. of its M characteristic must be used to cross the Traversable terrain feature, meaning the operative can move a total of 2.

Jump

A jump is when an operative crosses a gap between terrain that is within horizontally and vertically from one edge to the other. The operative must be within of the edge of the terrain feature the operative will jump from. To jump, take a jump test for the operative by rolling one D6: on a 1, the test is unsuccessful, the operative remains where it is and that action ends; on a 2+, the test is successful and you can move the operative across the gap. Only the horizontal distance an operative moves during a jump counts towards how far it has moved. Note that an operative cannot jump instead of climbing. If an operative simply wishes to ascend or descend a terrain feature, it must drop or climb instead.

Remember that an operative must finish a move in a location it can be placed. If this is not possible, such as if an operative does not have enough Movement to reach its intended destination, it cannot attempt the jump.

The operative intends to cross a gap between two terrain features without dropping and/or climbing. The operative is within of the edge of the terrain feature it will jump from. The gap is within horizontally and vertically from one edge to the other. The operative’s controlling player rolls one D6 and the result is a 5, therefore the test is successful. The operative moves across the gap, and only the horizontal distance it travels is counted for the move.

Climb

A climb is when an operative ascends or descends a terrain feature that it cannot traverse across during a move. First, the operative must be within of a physical and climbable part of a terrain feature to climb it - a wall, pipe, chain etc. The operative can then climb that terrain feature, counting the distance it travels towards the total distance it moves, rounding up any incremental distances of less than to .

Remember that an operative must finish a move in a location it can be placed. If this is not possible, such as if an operative does not have a high enough Movement characteristic to reach its intended destination, it cannot begin the climb. This means an operative cannot finish a move partway through a climb. An operative can, however, perform a Dash action during a climb in order to reach its intended destination.

  1. An operative with an M characteristic of 3 intends to climb onto the next level. It is within of a physical part of the terrain feature it can climb.

  2. It then climbs the terrain feature. It must move a vertical distance of more than but less than 2 increments are rounded up, it moves 2 vertically.

  3. To reach a location it can be placed, it must also move horizontally. The operative has of its M characteristic remaining, allowing it to move onto the next level. You could then move the operative the full distance onto the level.

  1. An operative with an M characteristic of 3 intends to climb onto the next level. It first moves be within of a physical part of a terrain feature it can climb.

  2. It then attempts to climb the terrain feature. It must move 2 vertically (increments rounded up) and horizontally. As this would exceed its M characteristic, it cannot begin the climb.

  3. If the operative has any action points remaining, however, it could perform a Dash action to complete the climb, so long as it hasn’t already performed a Dash action during its activation.

Drop

A drop is when an operative descends from height without climbing. The operative must be within of the edge of the terrain feature it will drop from, and the intended location must be vertically within 3 of the level it occupies. The operative can drop from that terrain feature counting the vertical distance it travels towards the total distance it moves. The vertical distance is measured in increments of , rounding down. Note that a total vertical distance of less than is therefore ignored. An operative can perform a Dash action during a drop in order to reach its intended destination.

Remember that an operative cannot move through any part of another operative’s base (unless it can FLY) Therefore if the intended location has any operatives that would prevent the operative moving in that direction, it cannot make the drop.

Flying Over Terrain

Operatives with the FLY keyword ignore vertical distances when moving on and over terrain features, meaning they do not need to climb or traverse and can move freely across gaps instead of jumping. In addition, when they drop, their intended location can be any vertical distance and the vertical distance they travel does not count towards the total distance they move.

  1. The operative intends to drop to the next level. It first moves to be within of the edge of the terrain feature it will drop from.
  2. The operative then drops from that terrain feature. The horizontal distance it moves is measured as normal. The vertical distance it moves is more than but less than 2. As increments are rounded down, it moves vertically.
  3. After the model has finished the drop, it can complete its move as normal with any remaining M characteristic it has.

Example Boards

This is an ideal set up for a killzone. It has numerous terrain features and a variety of terrain traits, allowing players to make crucial decisions on how their operatives will interact with the killzone. There are plenty of opportunities to keep operatives out of Line of Sight, as well as key positions to establish firing lanes and engage the enemy. Finally, it creates an exciting and dynamic battlefield that can set the scene for an intense skirmish between two forces.

This is an ideal set up for a killzone in which players have a particular way to play in mind. One side of the killzone has terrain features with the Heavy trait and protected Vantage Points, all the while offering a commanding view of the killzone. Conversely, the other side of the killzone has terrain features with the Light trait and exposed Vantage Points. As this killzone favours one side over the other, it is not suitable for a matched play game. However, it does accurately portray an attack on a well-defended position, therefore it is suitable for a narrative play game, particularly if the mission objectives accurately capture the narrative taking place.

This is not an ideal set up for a killzone. The edges are dominated by terrain features with the Heavy and Vantage Point trait, and there are a lack of substantial terrain features between them. This will make moving around the killzone a difficult task, as operatives will struggle to stay out of Line of Sight. Similarly, as all the large terrain features are at the edges of the killzone, it creates a large open area in the centre, rather than a variety of firing lanes and thoroughfares to fight over.

Example Terrain Features

If players are using a specific killzone for their game, its terrain features and traits will be specified. However, if players are using a killzone of their own devising, the players should agree upon the traits of the killzone’s terrain features before the battle. We have provided examples of different terrain features below as guidance:

Pipe

All parts of a Pipe terrain feature have the Light and Traversable trait.


Wall

All parts of a Wall terrain feature have the Heavy trait.


Battlefield Detritus

Battlefield Detritus are terrain features that are usually less than tall. They have the Insignificant trait. Note that if the crates below were stacked together, they could become a Killzone Materiel terrain feature.


Low Wall

All parts of a Low Wall terrain feature have the Light and Traversable trait.


Killzone Materiel

All parts of a Killzone Materiel terrain feature have the Light trait. They can also be Traversable, usually if they are no more than tall.



Building

A Building terrain feature can include parts with different traits.


Industrial Machine

All parts of an Industrial Machine terrain feature have the Heavy trait.


Forest

A Forest terrain feature includes parts with different traits.


Industrial Structure

An Industrial Structure terrain feature can include parts with different traits.


Munitorum Container

A Munitorum Container terrain feature includes parts with different traits.

Ways to Play

Once you have familiarised yourself with the rules presented on this page, it's time to wage skirmish warfare with your operatives in a game. Games of Warhammer 40,000: Kill Team are categorised by three ways to play: open play, matched play and narrative play.

Each method of play has a series of steps you should follow to play a game, known as the mission sequence. Within these steps you will play a battle - the four Turning Points in which your operatives attempt to complete their mission.

Open Play

Open play is a free-form and permissive style of play. If you are new to Warhammer 40,000: Kill Team, it is a great way to start. Open play provides a degree of simplicity, allowing you to practice all you’ve learnt so far and become familiar with the core mechanics of the game without any added depth. Open play is also a great way to play for those wanting the freedom to create their own battles, so even for the accomplished generals, it provides the creative mind the perfect chance to craft games that match their vision.

Matched Play

Matched play is the most mechanically balanced style of play. From this foundation, it is suitable for players looking for a fair game under common principles. Matched play is also suitable for players looking for an in-depth tactical battle, where smart decisions and decisive action achieves victory.

Narrative Play

Narrative play is a style of play for those looking to explore an element of storytelling. Whether it’s playing unique missions that capture the cinema of Warhammer 40,000: Kill Team, or embarking upon campaigns where each game is linked and the consequences matter, narrative play turns your games into a rich and thematic experience where the deeds and exploits of your operatives can be recorded and rewarded.

While the different ways to play have distinct philosophies, the game mechanics of playing a battle are the same. Therefore, if two players prefer a different way to play, they can still play one another with a few tweaks to the mission sequence. For example, if one of the players is playing through a Spec Ops campaign in narrative play, they would complete the Update Dataslates step of the mission sequence to keep track of their kill team’s experience and injuries, while their opponent would skip this step.
Actions
Actions are categorised as follows:
  • Universal actions can be performed by all operatives. They are detailed below.
  • Unique actions are actions detailed on an operative’s datacard that only they can perform, such as the Dakka Dash action found on the example datacard.
  • Mission actions are specific to the mission you are playing, and will be detailed by that mission’s briefing. Missions can be found here (Open Play mission) and here (Spec Ops Narrative missions).
  • Free actions can only be performed when another rule specifies. Each time an operative would perform a free action, the following rules apply.
    • The operative can perform the action, so long as the requirements of the action are met.
    • The player does not subtract any additional AP to perform the action.
    • The operative would still count as performing the action for all rules purposes. For example, if it performed it during its activation, it would not be able to perform the action again during that activation.

For example, when a KOMMANDO DAKKA BOY performs a Dakka Dash action (see unique actions, above), it can perform a free Dash and free Shoot action without subtracting any additional AP (other than the AP spent on the Dakka Dash action). However, it is subject to those actions’ requirements, therefore it cannot perform the free Dash action if it is within Engagement Range of enemy operatives, and cannot perform the free Shoot action if it is within Engagement Range of enemy operatives or has a Conceal order. In addition, for each of the free actions it performs, it cannot perform them again during its activation.
Visible
For an intended target to be Visible, the following must be true:
  • You can draw an imaginary, unobstructed straight line (known as a Visibility line) 1 mm wide from the head of the active operative’s miniature to any part of the miniature of the intended target (not its base).
In the rare instance that bases prevent an intended target from being Visible to the active operative, such as when the active operative is directly below or above the intended target, treat those bases as being invisible.

Some rare rules will require you to select a point that is Visible (e.g. a point on the killzone). In such circumstances, you must be able to draw an imaginary, unobstructed straight line 1mm wide from the head of the active operative’s miniature to the point you would select.
COMMAND RE-ROLL1CP
Tactical Ploy
Use this Tactical Ploy after rolling one of your attack dice or defence dice. You can re-roll that dice.
Engagement Range
Engagement Range is the zone of threat that operatives present to their enemies. Many rules in the game use Engagement Range, such as when moving and fighting. Engagement Range is mutual, therefore operatives are within each other’s Engagement Range if one of them is Visible to and within of the other.
Overwatch
When it is your turn to activate an operative, if you do not have any ready operatives left to activate, but your opponent has not yet activated all of their operatives, you can select a friendly operative that has an Engage order and has already activated this phase to perform a single Overwatch action. Each operative can perform one Overwatch action per Turning Point, and you can only select an operative to do so if your opponent still has operatives left to activate. That means that once your opponent has activated all their operatives, the Firefight phase ends.
Cover
If an operative positions themselves in Cover, they will use it for protection while they have an Engage order, or hide behind it while they have a Conceal order. For an intended target to be in Cover, both of the following must be true:
  • The intended target is more than from the active operative.
  • The intended target is within of a point at which a Cover line crosses another operative’s base (unless that other operative is not itself in the active operative’s LoS), or a terrain feature that provides Cover (see Terrain Traits).

Note that an intended target that has an Engage order can gain a defensive benefit for being in Cover as specified in the shooting sequence.

To establish Cover lines, the active operative’s controlling player draws imaginary straight lines, 1mm wide, from any part of the active operative’s base to every part of the intended target’s base.
APx
Armour Penetration. Each time a friendly operative makes a shooting attack with this weapon, subtract x from the Defence of the target for that shooting attack, x is the number after the weapon’s AP, e.g. AP1. If two different APx special rules would be in effect for a shooting attack, they are not cumulative - the attacker selects which one to use.
Blast x
Each time a friendly operative performs a Shoot action and selects this weapon (or, in the case of profiles, this weapon’s profile), after making the shooting attack against the target, make a shooting attack with this weapon (using the same profile) against each other operative within x of the original target. When determining if each other operative is a valid target or in Cover, treat the original target as the active operative. An operative cannot make a shooting attack with this weapon by performing an Overwatch action.

  1. An operative performs a Shoot action, selects a ranged weapon with the Blast special rule, and selects operative A as the target.
  2. After making the shooting attack against operative A, it makes a shooting attack against operative B, determining if it is a valid target as if operative A was making the shooting attack.
  3. It cannot make a shooting attack against operative C, as when determining if it is a valid target in this manner, operative C is not Visible to operative A due to the terrain feature between them.
Obscured
Regardless of whether a target operative has an Engage or Conceal order, if an Obscuring terrain feature is in the way, an active operative may be unable have LoS to them. For an intended target to be Obscured, the following must be true:
  • The intended target is more than from a point at which a Cover line crosses a terrain feature that is Obscuring (see Terrain Traits). However, if the active operative is within of a point at which a Cover line crosses a terrain feature that is Obscuring, that part of the terrain feature is not treated as Obscuring.
Fly
Each time an operative makes any kind of move, if it has the FLY keyword, it can move around, across and over other operatives (and their bases) as if they were not there, but must finish its move following all requirements specified by that move, and cannot finish its move on top of other operatives (or their bases).
© Vyacheslav Maltsev 2013-2021