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By now, you’ve scratched the surface of the many ways that you can enjoy the Warhammer 40,000 hobby. The missions that you have already seen are just the beginning – there are always new ways to play and battles to fight!


Battle-forged Armies

All armies, from the contingents of the T’au to the warbands of the Orks, are – to a greater or lesser extent – structured forces. This section explains how you can organise your units into Detachments; a group of units that fight together and gain a strategic or tactical bonus for doing so.

If a mission you are playing instructs you to select a Battle-forged army, it means that you must organise all the units in your army into Detachments.

An army can include any number of Detachments and you can mix them together however you like. Here you will find several Detachments that can be used with any army, and more will be published in other sources.

To include a particular Detachment in your army, simply organise some or all of your units so that they fit within the restrictions and limitations detailed for that particular Detachment. A unit cannot belong to more than one Detachment, and you will often need to use additional information found on a unit’s datasheet, such as Faction and Battlefield Role to determine where it fits in a Detachment.

Each Detachment may contain the following information:

Battlefield Role Slots: These show the number of units of each Battlefield Role that you must, or may, include in the Detachment.

Dedicated Transports: This details how many Dedicated Transport units the Detachment can include (if any).

Restrictions: This lists any restrictions that apply to the types of units you may include in the Detachment.

Command Benefits: This lists any bonuses that apply if you include this Detachment in your army.

Factions

All units belong to one or more of the many Factions that fight for dominance across the galaxy. A unit’s Faction is important when building a Battle-forged army because some Detachments require all units included in it to be from the same Faction. The Factions that a unit belongs to will be listed in the keywords section of its datasheet. For example, a Space Marine Captain has the IMPERIUM and ADEPTUS ASTARTES keywords, so belongs to both the Imperium and Adeptus Astartes Factions. This means that if a Space Marine Captain was part of a Detachment with the restriction that all units must be from the same Faction, all other units in that Detachment must either be from the Imperium Faction, or they must all be from the Adeptus Astartes Faction.

Battlefield Role

However you choose your army, all units have a Battlefield Role, which is typically shown as a symbol. Apart from providing a useful overview of the types of duties a unit is meant to perform, the role is also of importance when it comes to using Detachments. The most common Battlefield Roles are shown here.


Battlefield Role Slots

This section of a Detachment’s rules lists the minimum and maximum number of units in each Battlefield Role that you must or may include in the Detachment.

The icons on a Detachment are referred to as slots. Each slot will typically specify a single Battlefield Role. Each slot allows you to take one unit. Red icons are compulsory selections – you must take at least this many units of the appropriate Battlefield Role to include the Detachment in your army. Grey icons are optional selections – you can include up to this number of units with the appropriate Battlefield Role when including the Detachment in your army. Any further units of the same Battlefield Role will need to be taken in a different Detachment.

For example, in order to take a Battalion Detachment you must select three units with the Troops Battlefield Role, and cannot include more than six Troops units in the Detachment.

Occasionally, a Detachment slot will specify two or more Battlefield Roles, in which case any unit that has one of the specified roles may be taken in that slot. Rarely, a slot will not specify a Battlefield Role, in which case any type of unit can be taken, or it will specify a particular unit or units, in which case only those may be taken.

Understrength Units

Each unit’s datasheet will describe how many models make up that unit. Sometimes you may find that you do not have enough models to field a minimum-sized unit; if this is the case, you can still include one unit of that type in your army with as many models as you have available.

If you are using Power Ratings, you must still pay the Power Rating cost as if you had a minimum-sized unit, even though it contains fewer models. If you are using points, you only pay the points for the models you actually have in an understrength unit (and any wargear they are equipped with). An understrength unit still takes up the appropriate slot in a Detachment. If you are playing a matched play game, you can only include an understrength unit in an Auxiliary Support Detachment.

Restrictions

This section of a Detachment’s rules lists any additional restrictions that apply to the units you can include as part of the Detachment. If a datasheet does not adhere to a particular restriction, it cannot be included as part of the Detachment. The most common restriction is that all of the units included in a Detachment must be from the same Faction.

Command Benefits

This section of a Detachment’s rules lists any bonuses that apply if you include the Detachment in your army. Typically, the inclusion of a Detachment will increase the total number of Command Points your army has available to spend on Stratagems.

Stratagems

If a player has a Battle-forged army, they may spend Command Points (CPs) to use the following Stratagems in any mission they play.


1CP

COMMAND RE-ROLL

Stratagem

You can re-roll any single dice.

2CP

COUNTER-OFFENSIVE

Stratagem

This Stratagem is used right after an enemy unit that charged has fought. Select one of your own eligible units and fight with it next.

2CP

INSANE BRAVERY

Stratagem

You can automatically pass a single Morale test (this Stratagem must be used before taking the test).


Command Points

When you build a Battle-forged army, it will have a number of Command Points. These can be spent to utilise Stratagems – each of which represents a strategic or tactical asset available to your army.

All Battle-forged armies start with 3 Command Points. The simplest way to accrue more Command Points is to take more Detachments – many of which increase your total number of Command Points.

You can spend Command Points to use a Stratagem before or during a battle. Each time you use a Stratagem, reduce your Command Points total by the appropriate amount. If you do not have enough Command Points for a specific Stratagem, you cannot use it. Unless otherwise noted, you can use the same Stratagem multiple times during the course of a battle.

The different Stratagems available to players depend on the mission they are playing. Players can always use the three Stratagems presented below, but some missions, battlezones and expansions may introduce additional Stratagems to your battles.

Detachments


Battlefield Terrain

In this section, you will find expanded terrain rules. You do not need to use these rules to enjoy a battle – the rules for cover detailed in the core rules will suffice to shelter your warriors from incoming fire – but they will add a new dimension to your battlefield and help bring it to life.


Woods

Twisted woodlands grow on many a corpse-strewn battlefield.

INFANTRY units that are entirely on the base of a wood receive the benefit of cover. If your wood is not on a base, discuss with your opponent what the boundary of the wood is before the battle begins. Other units only receive the benefit of cover if at least 50% of every model is obscured from the point of view of the shooting model.

Models are slowed when charging through woods. If, when a unit charges, one or more of its models have to move across a wood’s base, you must subtract 2" from the unit’s charge distance.

Ruins

The galaxy is littered with the remains of once-proud cities.

Unless they can FLY, VEHICLES, MONSTERS, CAVALRY and BIKERS can only be set up or end their move on the ground floor of ruins.

INFANTRY are assumed to be able to scale walls and traverse through windows, doors and portals readily. These models can therefore move through the floors and walls of a ruin without further impediment.

INFANTRY units that are entirely on or within a ruin receive the benefit of cover. Other units that are entirely on or within a ruin only receive the benefit of cover if at least 50% of every model is obscured from the point of view of the shooting model.

Craters

Many worlds bear the scars of heavy, sustained bombardment.

INFANTRY units that are entirely within a crater receive the benefit of cover.

Models are slowed when charging across craters. If, when a unit charges, one or more of its models have to move across a crater, you must subtract 2" from the unit’s charge distance.

Barricades

Makeshift barricades make excellent defensive positions.

When a model targets an enemy INFANTRY unit that has all of its models within 1" of a barricade, the target unit receives the benefit of cover if the attacking model is closer to the barricade than it is to the target. In addition, enemy units can Fight across a barricade, even though the physical distance is sometimes more than 1". When resolving Fights between units on opposite sides of a barricade, units can be chosen to Fight and can make their attacks if the enemy is within 2" instead of the normal 1".

Obstacles

The advance of many armies has been thwarted by obstacles.

There are two kinds of obstacles: tank traps, which are obstacles to VEHICLES and MONSTERS, and tanglewire, which is an obstacle to everything else. Units are slowed when they attempt to move over obstacles. If, when a unit Advances or charges, one or more of its models have to move over an obstacle, you must halve the unit’s Advance or charge distance, as appropriate (rounding up). TITANIC models are not slowed by obstacles.

Imperial Statuary

The heroes of the Imperium are immortalised in stone effigies.

Units within 3" of Imperial Statuary that are at least 25% obscured by it from the point of view of the shooting model receive the benefit of cover.

In addition, IMPERIUM units within 3" of Imperial Statuary add 1 to their Leadership.

Fuel Pipes

Promethium and other explosive fuels are pumped across many worlds in armoured pipes.

Fuel pipes follow all the rules for barricades, with the following addition:

Roll a dice each time you make a saving throw of 7+ (usually a roll of 6, plus 1 for being in cover) for a model within 1" of a fuel pipe in the Shooting phase. On a 1, that shot has ruptured the pipe and caused a small explosion; the model’s unit suffers a mortal wound.

Battlescape

The smoking hulls of tanks and the blasted remains of trees speak of the presence of mines or other, more dangerous, traps.

Battlescapes follow all the rules for woods, with the following addition:

Roll a dice each time a model Advances or charges across a battlescape; on a roll of 1, that model has triggered a mine and its unit suffers a mortal wound. Models that can FLY can still trigger mines, but only if they charge across battlescape.

Hills

Hills and elevated positions are often key tactical locations.

Hills, whether free-standing or modelled into the battlefield itself, are raised areas that offer troops on top of them commanding views and fields of fire. Hills are always considered to be part of the battlefield rather than a terrain feature, and so models on top of them do not receive the benefits of cover. Some particularly large hills may block a model’s visibility to a target unit, however, so get a model’s-eye-view to see if this is ever the case.

Scratch-built Terrain

Many hobbyists enjoy making their own terrain features from scratch (thus the term ‘scratch-built terrain’). If you wish to incorporate such terrain features into your battlefields, you and your opponent will need to devise your own rules for them. Don’t worry – this is very easy to do, especially if you use the rules presented on these pages as examples and inspiration. You could, for example, model your ruins on a scenic base, and agree that the base itself is simply an extension of the ruins and follows all the same rules. Perhaps you will create a river (presumably a fantastical one filled with lava or acid) with entirely new rules, agreeing that the only models that can cross it safely are those that can FLY. Some players prefer to say that certain terrain features, such as giant rock formations or imposing sealed buildings, are simply impassable to any models – creating obstacles on the battlefield for armies to manoeuvre around. You could make up some truly exotic rules for your terrain, such as creating a portal to the warp through which Daemons can materialise throughout your battle. Anything goes, so long as all players agree that it sounds like fun!

Battlezones

The galaxy is ablaze with war, and millions of planets shake to the tread of mighty armies. Some are once-verdant paradises reduced to mud-churned ruins, others are hellishly overpopulated industrial hive worlds, while many are utterly inimical to life.

So long as you and your opponent agree, any Warhammer 40,000 battle can use Battlezone rules. They are optional, but Battlezone rules allow you to recreate battles fought in all manner of otherworldly environments, such as in the depths of hive cities, on asteroids hurtling through space, or even amidst the madness of worlds lost to the powers of Chaos. Each battlezone introduces new rules to your missions to represent the battlefield conditions of these varied worlds. They might change the core rules, for example by altering how psychic powers work. They can provide new rules for things like living terrain or tectonic activity, and may grant additional abilities to certain units.

Agree which, if any, Battlezone rules will be used when you are setting up the battlefield, before deployment. Three battlezones are presented here to help make sure that every battle you fight is different. You can find more battlezones in other Warhammer 40,000 publications, and if you feel inspired, you can always make your own!

Night Fight

Battles in low to zero visibility are a test for any general at the best of times. When the battlefield is obscured by darkness, howling ash storms, unnatural celestial phenomena or psychic obfuscation, it means enemies can be nearly invisible, reinforcements can be lost, and your objectives can become uncertain.

Low Visibility: When rolling to hit in the Shooting phase, apply the following penalties to your models depending on their distance from the target. If the target unit is exactly 12", 24", or 36" away, use the lesser penalty from the table.

DISTANCEPENALTY
0-12"No penalty
12-24"Hit rolls have a -1 penalty
24-36"Hit rolls have a -2 penalty
36"+Hit rolls have a -3 penalty

Fog of War: If a unit arrives on the battlefield after the battle has begun (e.g. as the result of an ability on its datasheet or the Reserves rules), roll a dice the first time it does so. On a 1 or 2, it is delayed and cannot arrive this turn – it arrives in the following turn instead.

STRATAGEMS
In this battlezone, you and your opponent can both use Command Points (CPs) to use the following Stratagem:


1CP

LIGHT ’EM UP

Stratagem

Select an enemy unit. For the duration of your turn, your units can shoot at that unit without penalties from Low Visibility.

Mysterious Objectives: If you are playing a mission with objective markers, any unit that moves within 3" of an objective marker, or is within 3" of an objective marker at the start of the first turn, must identify it. To do so, roll a dice and consult the following table. Each objective marker is only identified once.

D6RESULT
1Sabotaged!: The unit that identified this objective marker takes D3 mortal wounds.
2Nothing of Note: This has no additional effect.
3Grav-wave Generator: If you control this objective marker, any unit attempting to charge a friendly unit within 3" of this objective subtracts 2 from its charge move.
4Targeting Relay: If you control this objective marker, friendly units within 3" of this objective re-roll hit rolls of 1 when shooting.
5Scatterfield: If you control this objective marker, friendly units within 3" of this objective re-roll saving throw rolls of 1.
6Fire Support: If you control this objective marker, roll a dice at the end of your Shooting phase. On a roll of 5+, choose an enemy unit within 36". That unit suffers D3 mortal wounds.







Fire and Fury

The armies clash under a burning sky – far above the conflict, a cataclysmic battle is taking place in orbit, and the casualties of that war descend in burning fragments to bombard the armies on the cracked earth. It is insanity to fight in these conditions, but you will not be found wanting!

Burning Skies: Units that can FLY must roll a dice each time they move in the Movement phase (roll after they have completed their move). On a roll of 1, they suffer D3 mortal wounds.

The Earth Cracks: All Move characteristics are halved for units that begin their turn with any models entirely within a terrain feature, and a unit that charges through such terrain must roll a dice. On a roll of 1, it suffers D3 mortal wounds. Units that can FLY are not affected.

Meteoric Debris: In each of your Shooting phases, place three dice numbered 1, 2 and 3 anywhere on the battlefield, at least 12" apart. You then roll another dice; if the result matches the number of one of the dice, a flaming chunk of debris crashes into the battlefield at the corresponding dice’s location and every unit within 6" of it suffers D3 mortal wounds. If the result doesn’t match any placed dice, the debris has landed elsewhere on the planet this time.

WARLORD TRAIT
In this mission, your Warlord can choose the following Warlord Trait in place of any other:

Insane Bravado: This Warlord and any friendly units within 8" of them do not have to take Morale tests.

STRATAGEMS
In this battlezone, you and your opponent can both use Command Points (CPs) to use the following Stratagem:


2CP

ORBITAL BOMBARDMENT

Stratagem

In your Shooting phase, you may place six dice for Meteoric Debris, rather than 3. The dice should be numbered 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6.


Psychic Maelstrom

On countless worlds, psykers unaware of the terrible danger are tapping into powers they cannot control. In extreme cases, a psyker is transformed into a ghastly conduit for the warp, infesting their planet with daemonic corruption while amplifying the psychic potential of all who fight there.

The Warp Overflows: PSYKERS add 2 to their Psychic and Deny the Witch tests.

Psychic Amplification: PSYKERS can attempt to manifest one extra psychic power in their Psychic phase, and the range of all psychic powers (where they have a range) is doubled.

Mortal Peril: If you roll any double for a Psychic test, including a double 1 or double 6, the PSYKER suffers Terrors of the Warp (after resolving the psychic power, if it is successfully manifested). This counts as suffering Perils of the Warp, but instead of the usual rules, roll on the following table:
D6RESULT
1A Fate Worse Than Death: The psyker suffers 6 mortal wounds. If they are slain by this, your opponent may place a Chaos Spawn model, under their control, where the psyker was standing (or as close as possible).
2Overload: The psyker suffers D3 mortal wounds. If they are slain by this, each unit within 6" suffers D3 mortal wounds.
3A Door Closes: The psyker immediately forgets the psychic power that they were manifesting – they cannot manifest this power for the rest of the battle.
4Timeslip: The psyker may immediately attempt to manifest an extra psychic power in this phase (even one they have already manifested).
5Possession: Roll 2D6. If the total is greater than the psyker’s Leadership characteristic, they are possessed and controlled by your opponent for the rest of the battle.
6Transformation: Until your next Psychic phase, the psyker has a Strength characteristic of 10 and an invulnerable save of 2+.

Planetstrike

The Planetstrike expansion allows your armies to battle to the death in a devastating planetary assault. In Planetstrike, players take specific roles – one is the attacker, attempting to wrest control of a planet, and the other is the defender, who will do everything to hold it.

Planetary invasions are swift and terrible affairs, characterised by deafening noise, earth-shattering explosions and the stench of death. Thousands of battle-hungry warriors plunge downwards upon trails of flame and vapour like vengeful angels, pouring from the drop-craft and low-orbiting spaceships that darken the skies above. Megatonnes of ordnance hammer down around these airborne warriors, the detonations so devastating that the skies themselves seem afire. Attack craft roar across the sky through lattices of ruby-red las-fire and rocket contrails, strafing any soldier who dares stray into the open before screaming off through the flak to the next war zone. Pillars of ghostly light probe the skies, their colonnades all but transforming the battlefield into some vast and surreal shrine to the gods of war. The touch of these lights is certain death to any invader caught in their beams, and red-hot debris rains from the skies as batteries of antiaircraft guns take their toll. Gigantic landers plummet from the heavens, shaking the ground with their impact before disgorging yet more warriors into the merciless meat grinder of a planetary assault.

Below the chaotic skies lies a war-torn landscape chewed up and spat out by the incessant bombardments that precede the invasion. The devastated mudscape is punctuated only by the ruined shells of once-proud buildings and by inviolable strongholds that jut like tombstones from the tortured earth. The comparison is apt, for the doomed soldiers who defend these bastions from the storm of violence that threatens to consume them will emerge as corpses or not at all.

It is within this nightmarish and lethal crucible of battle that true heroes are forged into warriors of iron will and exceptional might who march grim-faced through barrages of shrapnel and fire without pause. It is these heroes who determine the fate of the planet, these heroes who defy the enemy to strike them down and tear the prize from their grip. Only the brave or the insane can hope to prosper. Empires have ever been built on the deeds of such dauntless individuals, and by their deeds they may also fall.

Planetstrike is truly a war on all fronts, in which the enemy can appear at any time, from anywhere – especially from above! Will you play the Defender, setting up formidable fortifications and giving everything you’ve got to repel the invaders? Or will you play the Attacker, raining hellfire and damnation upon the foe before sending an army of your best troops to claim the smoking remains of their strongholds? Whether you choose to tear the planet from your opponent’s grasp or annihilate the invaders raining from the skies, your actions can determine the fate of an entire world.

Planetstrike missions use the following additional rules:

Firestorm Attack

The planetary invasion is preceded by a fierce firestorm.

The Attacker makes Firestorm Attacks at the start of the first battle round, but before the first turn begins; each mission will specify how many are made. The Attacker first places six dice numbered 1 through 6 on the battlefield, anywhere at least 9" apart. For each Firestorm Attack, roll one dice: every unit within 3" of the corresponding dice’s location suffers D6 mortal wounds. INFANTRY units hit by a Firestorm Attack can choose to go to ground before the damage is rolled; if they do, they only suffer D3 mortal wounds, but cannot do anything during their first turn.

Planetary Assault

The attacker’s forces rain from the skies to assault the defenders.

In Planetstrike missions, the Attacker’s units are not set up on the battlefield during deployment and instead start the game in Reserve. INFANTRY units and units that can FLY start the game in orbit, whilst other units start the game in a landing zone, just off one edge of the battlefield.

Roll a dice for each of your units still in Reserve at the end of each of your Movement phases (this is called a Reserve roll) – on a 3+ that unit arrives from Reserve. Note that if a unit placed in Reserve is embarked within a TRANSPORT, they will arrive when their transport does, not separately (if rolling, make a single roll for the transport and its embarked units).

If the unit arrived from orbit, place it anywhere on the battlefield more than 6" from any enemy model. If the unit arrived from a landing zone, place it within 6" of the battlefield edge chosen as the Attacker’s landing zone.

Planetstrike Defences

The Defender can use the following rules for defences in Planetstrike:

Bastions

These shelter the Defender’s forces as they repel invading armies.

Bastions cannot move for any reason, nor can they Fight. Enemy models automatically hit them in a Fight – do not make hit rolls. Each Bastion has a Toughness of 10, a Save of 3+, 20 Wounds, and is removed once it has lost all its wounds. Each has a Ballistic Skill of 5+ and is equipped with four heavy bolters (see below).

The Defender’s INFANTRY units can garrison a Bastion, moving in and out of it in the same manner as a unit embarking or disembarking from a TRANSPORT. Up to 20 models can garrison a Bastion at any one time. Garrisoning units cannot normally do anything or be affected in any way, with the exception that they can still shoot in your Shooting phase. If the Bastion is destroyed, each unit garrisoning it must disembark, but the Defender must then roll a dice for each model just set up on the battlefield; for each roll of 1, 2 or 3, a model that disembarked (Defender’s choice) is crushed by falling rubble and slain.

Defence Emplacements

Defence Emplacements are used to shoot down invading forces.

Defence Emplacements cannot move for any reason, nor can they Fight. Enemy models automatically hit them in a Fight – do not make hit rolls. Each Defence Emplacement has a Toughness of 7, a Save of 4+, 3 Wounds and is removed once it loses all of its wounds. Each Defence Emplacement has a Ballistic Skill of 5+ and is armed with either an Icarus lascannon or a quad-gun (see below). Add 1 to the hit rolls when shooting one of these weapons at a unit that can FLY, or at a unit that arrived from orbit during the Attacker’s previous turn. Subtract 1 when shooting at any other target.

WEAPON PROFILES
RTYPESAPD
Heavy bolter36"Heavy 35-11
Quad-gun48"Heavy 87-11
Icarus lascannon96"Heavy 19-3D6

Planetstrike Stratagems

In Planetstrike games, players can use the following additional Stratagems, depending on whether they are the Attacker or the Defender:


2CP

SCORCHED SKIES

Attacker Stratagem

This Stratagem is used just before you resolve your Firestorm Attacks. You make D3 additional Firestorm Attacks.

1CP

RAPID DROP ASSAULT

Attacker Stratagem

This Stratagem is used before making any Reserve rolls at the start of your first turn. D3 units of your choice automatically arrive from Reserve.

1CP

TARGETING JAMMERS

Defender Stratagem

This Stratagem is used just before the Attacker resolves their Firestorm Attacks. You can move one of the Firestorm location dice up to 2D6" in any direction.

2CP

FORTIFIED STRONGHOLD

Defender Stratagem

This Stratagem is used before the Attacker resolves his Firestorm Attacks. Select a single Bastion. That Bastion has 25 Wounds instead of 20.


Planetfall

Invading forces orbit above, raining fire upon the foe, their landing parties inbound to take for themselves any fortresses still standing. The defender must weather the storm and repel the enemy, no matter the cost. The attacker must not rest until the world is theirs.

THE ARMIES
The players should first choose who is the Attacker and who is the Defender, then each selects a Battle-forged army. The Power Level of the Attacker’s army should be greater than that of the Defender’s.

THE BATTLEFIELD
The Defender creates the battlefield; they start by setting up any number of Fortifications (Bastions, Defence Emplacements, etc.). They then set up all other terrain on the battlefield however they choose. Once the Defender has created the battlefield, the Attacker chooses one battlefield edge to be their landing zone – this is where their non-orbital Reserves will arrive from.

Next, the Defender places 6 objective markers. One objective marker may be placed inside each Bastion. Any objective marker not placed in a Bastion must be placed anywhere on the battlefield so long as the centre of each is more than 6" from the centre of any other objective marker, any Bastion or any battlefield edge. If a Bastion containing an objective marker is destroyed during the game, the Defender must place the objective marker where the building used to be.

DEPLOYMENT
The Defender now sets up all of their units, anywhere on the battlefield. The Attacker’s units do not start the game on the battlefield, but use the Planetary Assault rules.

FIRESTORM ATTACK
The Attacker rolls a D3 and adds 1 to the result for each Bastion that is on the battlefield. The total is the number of Firestorm Attacks that the Attacker makes.

FIRST TURN
The Attacker has the first turn.

BATTLE LENGTH
The game lasts for 6 battle rounds.


VICTORY CONDITIONS
At the end of the game, the player who has scored the most victory points is the winner. If both players have the same number of victory points, the game is a draw. Victory points are achieved for the following:

Storm and Defend: At the end of the game, each objective marker is worth 3 victory points to the player who controls it. A player controls an objective marker if they have more models within 3" of the centre of it than their opponent does. If an objective marker is within a Bastion, count all the models within 3" of the building and all the models garrisoning it when determining who controls the objective marker.

Slay the Warlord: If the enemy Warlord has been slain during the battle, you score 1 victory point.

The battlefield shown here is an example of a classic setup for a game of Planetstrike. The Defender has chosen to place his Fortifications in the centre of the battlefield so that, whichever direction the Attacker chooses to come from, they will be ready.

Cities of Death

In the nightmare of the far future, armies battle one another to annihilation amid the shattered ruins of vast corpse-strewn cities. The Cities of Death expansion allows both players to recreate the brutal, closeconfines nature of urban warfare.

In a galaxy of war, cities make for the bloodiest of battlefields. Bombed from orbit, the blasted city ruins are overrun by hordes of slavering aliens or crushed to rubble beneath the footfalls of titanic war machines. Warriors engage in bitter close-quarters battles whilst mighty battle tanks smash through crumbling buildings, grinding bricks and bodies both beneath their treads. Victory will only be won by an army ruthless and determined enough to drive its enemy from every collapsed building, root out and eradicate every firebase, and level every stronghold to deny even a single sniper a vantage point. Every building, staircase and hallway becomes a battleground fought over by dozens of warriors, no quarter given until the floor is carpeted with the bodies of the dead and the walls are blasted rubble.

Battle lines are drawn from one street corner to another and soldiers dart across shell-pocked roads. No man’s land is watched over by merciless snipers waiting for the next fool to stray into their sights. In these cramped confines, warriors fight on long after their ammunition is spent. With the butts of rifles and scavenged weapons, they bludgeon their foes to death, stabbing and hacking in a frenzy to survive. In such battles, combatants are at their most base and low, and no tactic is too desperate, no rule unbreakable to achieve victory. City fighting takes all the horrors of war and magnifies them. Territory is more important, lives are cheaper, and survival is all but impossible.

Cities of Death missions use the following additional rules:

City Ruins

Unless they can FLY, VEHICLES, MONSTERS and BIKES can only end their move on the ground floor of ruins.

INFANTRY are assumed to be able to scale walls and traverse through windows, doors and portals readily. These models can therefore move through the floors and walls of a ruin without further impediment.

INFANTRY units that are on or behind a ruin receive the benefit of cover. INFANTRY units that do not move in their Movement phase are better able to make use of available cover in Cities of Death. Until they next move, you add 2 to their saving throws instead of only 1 against all shooting attacks. Other units only receive the benefit of cover if at least 50% of every model is actually obscured from the point of view of the shooting unit.

Height Advantage

In urban warfare, every soldier in a tall building is a sniper, raking fire onto those below. Combating foes with such a height advantage is nigh impossible.

A model gains a Height Advantage whilst occupying the upper levels of a city ruin and shooting at a unit that is either at street level or within a lower level of city ruins. To gain a Height Advantage, every model in the target unit must be on levels that are 3" or more below that of the firing model. If a model shoots with a Height Advantage, the target does not receive any of the benefits for being in cover.

Streets and Roads

Forces can move quickly across streets and roads, but doing so often leaves them exposed to enemy fire.

You can move a model an extra 2" if it spends its entire Movement phase on a street or road (move a model an extra 4" instead if the unit Advances). This has no effect on units that can FLY.

Fire in the Hole

In the close confines or building-to-building warfare, grenades are especially effective.

In Cities of Death battles, re-roll all failed wound rolls made when a model throws a Grenade at a unit on or in ruins. Furthermore, if a Grenade makes a random number of attacks, that Grenade always makes the maximum number of attacks instead (e.g. a Grenade D6 profile would instead be treated as a Grenade 6 profile when thrown at a unit occupying ruins).

Cities of Death Stratagems

In Cities of Death games, players can use the following additional Stratagems:


2CP

SEWER RATS

Stratagem

This Stratagem is used just before you set up an INFANTRY unit during deployment. Instead of setting up that unit on the battlefield, they are infiltrating the city’s sewer network. At the end of any of your Movement phases, you can set the unit up anywhere on the battlefield at street level that is more than 9" from any enemy model and not in a city ruin.

1CP

MEDICAE FACILITY

Stratagem

This Stratagem is used after both sides have deployed, but before the first battle round begins. Nominate a single city ruin to house the Medicae Facility. Roll a dice each time a model loses a wound whilst occupying that city ruin; on a 6, the model has been healed by the medicae equipment and does not lose that wound.

1CP

BOOBY TRAPS

Stratagem

This Stratagem is used after both sides have deployed, but before the first battle round begins. Secretly nominate a single city ruin to house the Booby Traps and write this down – this cannot be a city ruin that is currently occupied by any models. The first time any model, moves into the city ruin, they trigger the Booby Traps and suffer D3 mortal wounds (D6 if they were Advancing).

1CP

DEATH IN THE STREETS

Stratagem

This Stratagem can be used when a unit with a Height Advantage shoots an enemy unit that is entirely at street level and not in cover. You can re-roll all failed hit and wound rolls when resolving shots at that enemy unit.


Firesweep

Both sides are moving forwards to occupy as much of the city as possible, conducting a room-to-room, building-to-building and street-to-street advance. Each force must attempt to claim as many buildings as they can, clearing the enemy as they move.

THE ARMIES
Both players select a Battle-forged army. Neither army can include any Fortifications.

THE BATTLEFIELD
Create the battlefield. Players must set up at least six city ruins, but should place more if they can. The streets and areas between the city ruins should be liberally littered with obstacles, barricades, wreckage and other detritus so that troops have some shelter as they dash from one building to another.

After terrain has been set up, the players must place 6 objective markers to denote the Critical city ruins they are attempting to claim (see VICTORY CONDITIONS). The players should roll off and, starting with whoever rolled highest, alternate placing these objective markers until all 6 have been set up. The objective markers must each be located in a different city ruin.

DEPLOYMENT
The player who placed the sixth objective marker now picks one quarter of the battlefield, as shown on the map below, for their deployment zone, and their opponent uses the diagonally opposite quarter of the battlefield as their deployment zone. Next, players alternate deploying their units, one at a time, starting with the player who did not pick their deployment zone. A player’s models must be set up wholly within their own deployment zone. Continue setting up units until both sides have set up their army.

POWER LEVEL
After both sides have deployed, determine each army’s Power Level by adding the Power Ratings of all its units; whichever player has the lowest is the Underdog. If both have the same Power Level, the player who assigned the deployment zones is the Underdog. If the difference between the Power Levels of the two armies is 10 to 19, the Underdog receives 1 bonus CP; if the difference is 20 to 29, they receive 2 CPs and so on.

FIRST TURN
The player who completed setting up their army first can choose to take the first or second turn.

BATTLE LENGTH
The game lasts for 6 battle rounds.

VICTORY CONDITIONS
At the end of the game, the player controlling the most Critical city ruins earns a major victory. If both players control the same number, the Underdog scores a minor victory. A player controls a Critical city ruin if they have more models on or in that ruin than their opponent.
The battlefield shown here is an example of a classic set-up for a game of Cities of Death. The battlefield contains several city ruins through which infantry can fight and take cover, and exposed roads, across which the brave can attempt to cover ground.

Stronghold Assault

Across the galaxy, siege warfare is a way of life. In Stronghold Assault one player is the Attacker, throwing themselves against the walls of monolithic fortresses, and the other is the Defender, who will garrison every fortification, gun emplacement and blood-soaked trench to the last.

The galaxy’s battlefields are punctuated with monolithic strongholds that reach towards the heavens, studded with enough weapon emplacements and firing ports to hold back entire armies. These fortifications are monuments to the unyielding nature of siege warfare. Many have endured centuries of unrelenting battle, and in their shadows, warriors beyond counting have been slain. Some have even withstood more than ten millennia of grinding war, sheltering troops as they unleash their own fury against the foe.

Nested within the grandest bastions are weapons of such terrible magnitude that they can annihilate the mightiest machines of war, or even cripple a battleship in low orbit. These jutting fortresses do not stand alone in their endless vigil over the galaxy’s battlefields – defence lines and trench networks protect and connect the bunkers and weapon towers at their heart.

However, even the most formidable series of fortifications are naught but walls and barricades without a garrison to defend them. Only when soldiers man battlements and operate weapon systems is a fortification’s true defensive potential realised. Even a single squad of warriors can be transformed into an unyielding foe when occupying a bunker, pouring down firepower upon their enemies with impunity, safe from all but the heaviest retaliation. It is no surprise, therefore, that commanders seek to control these unyielding bulwarks. Control of such assets can be the difference between victory and defeat. As such, they are never defended lightly, nor taken from the enemy without considerable losses.

Stronghold Assault missions use the following additional rules:

Big Guns Never Tire

The attacker has brought along their heaviest ordnance to level the defences of the foe.

The Attacker’s models can move and shoot Heavy weapons without incurring the -1 penalty to their hit rolls, but only when targeting a Bunker or a Fortress.

Demolitions

The attacking troops are equipped with demolition tools and explosive charges to breach the enemy’s defences.

Each time the Attacker makes a wound roll of 6+ for a model Fighting a Bunker or a Fortress, the structure suffers a mortal wound in addition to any other damage.

Stronghold Defences

The defenders await the onslaught of their enemy, secure in the protection offered by their fortifications and trenches.

The Defender can use the following rules for their defences in games of Stronghold Assault:

Defence Lines

Defence Lines are trenches or armoured shield sections that provide troops with shelter.

INFANTRY models that are within 1" of a Defence Lines and behind it, from the point of view of the firing unit, receive the benefit of cover. In addition, these models can take cover at any point during the enemy turn – as soon as they do so, improve their Save by 2 until the start of the enemy’s next turn, but they can do nothing until then.

In addition, enemy units can fight across a Defence Line, even though the physical distance is sometimes more than 1". When resolving Fights against units on opposite sides of a Defence Line, units can be chosen to Fight if the enemy is within 2", instead of the normal 1". In order to attack an enemy unit on the opposite side of a Defence Line, an attacking model must either be within 2" of that unit, or within 1" of another model from its own unit that is itself within 2" of that enemy unit. This represents the unit fighting in two ranks.

Bunkers and Fortresses

These fortifications are used to shelter the Defender’s forces as they repel invading armies.

When the Defender creates their army, they can include as many Bunkers and Fortresses as they wish. Each is a single model that takes up a single Fortifications Battlefield Role slot in a Detachment. Bunkers have a Power Rating of 5, whilst Fortresses have a Power Rating of 15.

Bunkers and Fortresses cannot move for any reason, nor can they Fight. Enemy models automatically hit them in a Fight – do not make hit rolls. Each Bunker and Fortress has a Toughness of 10 and a Save of 3+. A Bunker has 15 Wounds and a Fortress has 30 – either is removed once destroyed. A Fortress has a Ballistic Skill of 5+ and is equipped with two Icarus lascannons, a missile silo and up to four heavy bolters (see right).

INFANTRY units can garrison a Bunker or a Fortress, moving in and out of it in the same manner as a unit embarking or disembarking from a TRANSPORT. Up to 20 models can garrison a Bunker at any one time, and up to 40 can garrison a Fortress. Garrisoned units cannot normally do anything or be affected in any way with the exception that they can still shoot in your Shooting phase. If the Bunker or Fortress is destroyed, each unit garrisoning it must disembark, but the controlling player must then roll a dice for each model just set up on the battlefield; for each roll of 1, 2 or 3, a model that disembarked (controlling player’s choice) is slain.

Captured Fortress

An undefended stronghold is an asset for the attacker to capture and turn upon the foe.

At the start of most Stronghold Assault missions, Bunkers and Fortresses are under the control of the Defender. However, the Attacker can garrison any unoccupied building using the same rules. If they do so, the building immediately comes under their control. Buildings can potentially exchange hands several times over the course of the battle.

WEAPON PROFILES
RTYPESAPD
Heavy bolter36"Heavy 35-11
Icarus lascannon96"Heavy 19-3D6
Missile silo*96"Heavy 3D6401
*The missile silo cannot shoot enemy units that are within 18".

Stronghold Assault Stratagems

In Stronghold Assault games, players can use the following additional Stratagems, depending on whether they are the Attacker or the Defender:


1CP

SAPPERS

Attacker Stratagem

This Stratagem is used just before one of your units Fights a Bunker or Fortress. You can add 1 to all wound rolls made for that unit that target a Bunker or Fortress this Fight phase.

1CP

ESCAPE HATCH

Defender Stratagem

This Stratagem is used when one of your Bunkers or Fortresses is destroyed. Garrisoning models are only slain on a roll of 1, instead of a roll of 1, 2 or 3.


Bunker Assault

One side has withdrawn behind the shelter of unyielding bunkers, holding the advancing foe at arm’s reach whilst calling down withering salvoes of artillery strikes. The attacker must destroy or overwhelm the bunkers as quickly as possible, before the barrages pound them into oblivion.

THE ARMIES
The players should first choose who is the Attacker and who is the Defender, then each selects a Battle-forged army. The Power Level of the Attacker’s army should be greater than that of the Defender’s. The Defender must include at least one Fortification Network Detachment containing between 1 and 3 Bunkers and/or Fortresses, in any combination.

THE BATTLEFIELD
The Defender creates a battlefield. They start by first setting up their Bunkers and Fortresses within their deployment zone. They then set up as many Defence Lines as they like. Then set up other terrain on the battlefield – we suggest a few ruins or craters.

DEPLOYMENT
After the battlefield has been created, the Defender sets up their army wholly within their deployment zone. The Attacker then sets up their army wholly within their deployment zone.

TARGETING AUGER
After both sides have deployed, the Defender selects one of their Bunkers or Fortresses to house the Targeting Auger. Whilst this Fortification is garrisoned by one of the Defender’s units, they can direct an artillery strike at the start of each of their Shooting phases. To do so, place a marker (such as a dice or a coin) anywhere on the battlefield. Your opponent can then move the marker D6" in any direction. After this is done, roll a dice for each unit (friend or foe) within 3" of the marker – on a 3+, that unit suffers D3 mortal wounds.

FIRST TURN
The Attacker has the first turn.

BATTLE LENGTH
The game lasts for 6 battle rounds.

VICTORY CONDITIONS
At the end of the game, the player who has scored the most victory points is the winner. If both players have the same number of victory points, the game is a draw. Victory points are achieved for the following:

No Quarter Given: Each player scores 1 victory point for each enemy unit that is destroyed.

Rubble and Ruin: The Attacker scores 3 victory points for each Bunker they destroy, and for each Bunker they have captured and still hold at the end of the game. The Defender scores 3 victory points for every other Bunker still on the battlefield at the end of the game. Each Fortress is instead worth 6 victory points.
The battlefield shown here is an example of a classic set-up for a game of Stronghold Assault.

When setting up the table, any Fortifications that are purchased as part of an army list must be placed wholly within their controlling player’s table half.

Death from the Skies

Fire fills the skies as squadron after squadron of aircraft scream into battle. The Death from the Skies expansion allows players to recreate battles where squadrons of aircraft are critical to success and where skilled aces engage in fast-paced dogfights for dominance of the skies.

The clouds burn as squadrons of aircraft tear across the skies and engage in deadly combat. Even as mighty armies clash upon war-torn battlefields, so the skies above play host to battles of their own. Swift fighter wings dogfight furiously with one another, and ace pilots prey upon their victims with sublime skill. Squadrons of bombers thunder in through skies alive with flak, dropping ordnance into the swirling battle below. Meanwhile, attack craft punch through enemy fighter screens to strafe the foe and deliver warriors to the heart of battle. Everywhere, wise commanders seek to dominate the air, knowing that this will secure victory on the ground.

Wings of lightning-fast jet fighters hurtle through acid squalls or weave between the towers of megalithic cityscapes to blow enemy aircraft out of the skies. As their landbound comrades fight and die down below, these courageous pilots engage in adrenaline-charged aerial duels where a split second’s hesitation means death.

All the while, flights of bombers thunder into cauldrons of fire to hammer shield generators, dark idols and super-heavy war engines with lethal ordnance. The destruction wrought by squadrons of heavy bombers obliterates such ground targets wholesale.

Even as this carnage is unleashed, aerial transports and gunships swoop from on high. Strafing runs shred infantry formations, gunning down bestial monsters and turning enemy tanks into fireballs, before disgorging hordes of battle-ready killers from their armoured holds.

Whether forging through sentient rust-cyclones or engaging winged Daemons in the starlit void of space, squadrons of aircraft rule the war-torn heavens.

Death from the Skies missions use the following additional rules:

Flyers

All Flyers – that is, units specifically with the Flyer Battlefield Role – can make use of the expanded Flyer rules below. For many of these rules, the Flyers’ arcs will be important. Flyers have four 90° arcs: one front, one rear and two side arcs.


Dogfight Phase

Aircraft duel to the death in the burning skies above.

In Death from the Skies missions, Flyers can only target enemy Flyers with shooting attacks during the Dogfight phase. This is an extra phase introduced in each player’s turn between their Movement and Psychic phases.

In the Dogfight phase, starting with the player whose turn it is, players alternate selecting one of their Flyers and then selecting an enemy Flyer as the target of their Dogfight. Your Flyer can immediately shoot with any of its weapons as if it were the Shooting phase. It can only shoot at the targeted Flyer, however, and cannot use Bombs and similar ordnance during the Dogfight phase. Furthermore, only those weapons that are in arc can shoot at the Flyer, such is the twisting and turning nature of Dogfights. Draw an imaginary line between the centre of your Flyer to the centre of the target Flyer to determine which of your weapons can be fired at that target; turret weapons can shoot in any direction, tailmounted weapons can only shoot targets in the Flyer’s rear arc and all other weapons can only shoot targets in the Flyer’s front arc.

You will receive an additional modifier to your hit rolls depending on which of the target Flyer’s arcs is facing the shooter, as follows:
  • Rear (Tailing): +2 to all hit rolls.
  • Front (Head-on Pass): +1 to all hit rolls.
  • Side (Deflection Shot): No modifier.
Once your Flyer has resolved its shots, your opponent then chooses one of their Flyers to Dogfight, until all the Flyers that the players wish to Dogfight have done so. Then move onto the Psychic phase as normal.

Flyers that shoot in the Dogfight phase can still shoot in their Shooting phase as normal, but remember that they can only target enemy Flyers in the Dogfight phase, so will need to shoot at ground-based targets instead.

Leaving Combat Airspace

Sometimes pilots are forced to overshoot their primary target and come around for another pass.

In an exception to the Minimum Move section of the core rules, Flyers can move off the edge of the battlefield – indeed, because of minimum moves, some may be forced to do so. These Flyers are said to have Left Combat Airspace. They can attempt to return to combat airspace at the end of their next Movement phase. To do so, roll a dice; on a 1 or 2, it has been delayed and does not arrive this turn, but you can roll again in your next turn. On a 3+, that Flyer arrives and is set up on the board as follows. Place the Flyer touching any battlefield edge facing any direction and move it directly forwards up to 6" (it cannot turn again). Flyers are always assumed to have moved their maximum distance when arriving on the battlefield in this manner.

Any Flyer that has Left Combat Airspace and has not re-entered it by the end of the game counts as destroyed for the purposes of any victory conditions.

Death from the Skies Stratagems

In Death from the Skies games, players can use the following additional Stratagems:


1CP

EVASIVE MANOEUVRES

Stratagem

This Stratagem is used when one of your Flyers is targeted by an enemy Flyer in a Dogfight. You can re-roll all failed saving throws made for that Flyer this phase, but you must subtract 1 from any hit rolls made for it until the end of the current turn.

1-3CP

REFUEL, REARM, REPAIR

Stratagem

This Stratagem is used as soon as one of your Flyers Leaves Combat Airspace. If you spend 1 CP, the aircraft automatically re-enters combat airspace at the end of your next Movement phase – there is no need to roll a dice. If you spend 2 CPs, the aircraft also regains any weapons that are described as only being able to be used a limited number of times during a battle (bombs, etc.). If you spend 3 CPs, the aircraft also regains D3 wounds.


Tactical Strike

A window of opportunity has arisen for your bombers and ground-attack craft to strike at strategically vital ground targets. The attacker must strike fast, for the defender is even now scrambling fighters to intercept the attacking aircraft.

THE ARMIES
The players should first choose who is the Attacker and who is the Defender, then each selects a Battle-forged army. Both armies must include at least one Air Wing Detachment. We recommend that the Defender’s army include a few Fortifications as well. The Power Level of the Attacker’s army should be greater than that of the Defender’s.

THE BATTLEFIELD
Create a battlefield using the deployment map below that is large enough to accommodate both armies. Next, set up terrain. The Defender’s deployment zone should contain several defensible pieces of terrain, such as ruins, in which they can take shelter from the air raids.

The Defender then sets up 5 objective markers to denote the Attacker’s Ground Objectives. These can be placed anywhere that is not in terrain, or anywhere on a Fortification with Wounds, but each must be at least 6" away from any other (measure to the centre of the objective marker).

DEPLOYMENT
The Defender sets up their army wholly within their deployment zone. The Attacker then sets up their army wholly within their deployment zone.


GROUND OBJECTIVE
The Attacker must target and destroy the Ground Objectives. If a marker is placed on a Fortification, that Ground Objective is destroyed when the Fortification is. Markers that are not on terrain represent underground targets; these have a Toughness of 6, a Save of 4+ and 10 Wounds (in a Fight, Ground Objectives are hit automatically – no hit dice is rolled).

BUNKER BUSTERS
The Attacker adds 1 to all hit and wound rolls made for their Flyers when targeting Ground Objectives.

FIRST TURN
The Attacker has the first turn.

BATTLE LENGTH
The game lasts for 6 battle rounds.

VICTORY CONDITIONS
If, at the end of the game, 4 or more Ground Objectives have been destroyed, the Attacker wins a major victory. If 2 or fewer have been destroyed, the Defender wins a major victory. If 3 have been destroyed, and the Power Level of the Attacker’s army is at least 10 greater than that of the Defender’s, the Defender wins a minor victory, otherwise the battle is a draw.

Multiplayer Battles

The rules for Warhammer 40,000 are written for battles fought between two players, each commanding an army. However, it is equally enjoyable to play multiplayer games between three or more players, each striving separately to defeat their opponents!

In a multiplayer battle there can be as many sides as there are players! Each player must attempt to defeat all of their opponents, using any means at their disposal in order to achieve victory. It is very simple to play a multiplayer battle, and only requires a handful of minor modifications to the core rules, which are detailed below.

Missions

Multiplayer battles are best fought using missions that are designed specifically for them, such as the multiplayer mission presented below, called ‘Carnage’. However, it is easy to modify many two-player missions for use in multiplayer games by following these guidelines:

The Armies

To play a multiplayer battle, you must have three or more players. Each player then chooses an army; the models belonging to all of the other players are treated as enemy models.

Battle Rounds

Each battle round is split into three or more turns – one for each player. Unless otherwise stated, at the start of each battle round, players roll off. The player who rolls highest decides who takes the first turn in that battle round.

After the first player has finished their turn, the players who have not yet had a turn yet roll off. The player who rolls highest decides who will take the next turn in that battle round.

After that player has finished their turn, the remaining players roll again to see who takes the next turn, and so on, until all of the players have had a turn. Then, the battle round is over and a new one begins.

Psychic Phase

Only one player is allowed to attempt to resist a successfully manifested psychic power – if several players wish to do so, then the player whose turn is taking place can choose which one gets to make the attempt.

Charge Phase

After a player has moved all their charging models, the other players can attempt to perform Heroic Interventions in an order decided by the player whose turn it is. An enemy CHARACTER can only perform a Heroic Intervention if it is within 3" of a model controlled by the player whose turn it is.

Fight Phase

Any unit that has models within 1" of an enemy unit can Fight in this phase. Models can be used to attack any enemy models, not just those belonging to the player whose turn is taking place.

Units that charged this turn Fight first as normal. Then, the player whose turn it is chooses an order for all the players (including themselves) to select a unit to Fight with, before the next player chooses a unit. Continue going around in the same order until all eligible units that you want to Fight have done so. If one player completes all of their units’ Fights first, or they don’t have any units that can Fight, then the other players complete all of their remaining Fights, one unit after another, in the same order. No unit can Fight more than once in each Fight phase.

Morale Phase

In the Morale phase, all players must take Morale tests for units from their army that have had models slain during the turn. The player whose turn it is tests first, and they then decide the order in which the other players will take their Morale tests.

Multiplayer Stratagem

In multiplayer missions, each player can use Command Points (CPs) to use the following Stratagem:


1+CP

BRIBE

Stratagem

You can use this Stratagem at any time to give any number of your remaining CPs to another player to bargain for a temporary ceasefire, alliance, betrayal, etc.


Hints & Tips

In a battle fought between three or more opponents, each general taking part must learn to be cunning! You must be able to set your foes against each other, form temporary alliances, and know when to stab someone in the back before they do the same thing to you. In other words, a successful general needs to be willing to use underhand ploys and tactics in order to win a battle!

Carnage

Several armies converge on the same battlefield, each determined to capture it for themselves. Make whatever truces you must and betray whomever you wish, but be careful – when the battle is over, there can be only one victor.

THE ARMIES
In order to play this mission, you will need three or four players. Each must select a Battle-forged army.

THE BATTLEFIELD
Create a battlefield and set up terrain; as it will need to accommodate up to four armies, you might need to use a slightly larger battlefield than normal. Then, place a single objective marker in the centre of the battlefield.

DEPLOYMENT
The battlefield is divided into quarters. The players roll off; the winner chooses one of the quarters to be their deployment zone. Then, the remaining players roll off. The winner selects one of the other quarters to be their deployment zone, and so on, until all the players have a deployment zone.

The players then alternate deploying their units, one at a time, starting with the player who selected their deployment zone first, then the player who selected their deployment zone second, and so on. Models must be set up wholly within their own
deployment zone, more than 9" from the centre of the battlefield. Continue setting up units until all sides have set up their armies.

POWER LEVEL AND RANKING
After all sides have deployed, determine each army’s Power Level by adding together the Power Ratings of all the units set up in that army. Then rank the armies from highest Power Level to lowest. If two have the same Power Level, the players should roll off. Whoever wins has the higher rank.

FIRST TURN
The player with the lowest rank chooses who has the first turn during the first battle round. The player with the second lowest rank chooses who has the second turn during the first battle round, and so on.

BATTLE LENGTH
The game lasts for 5 battle rounds.

VICTORY CONDITIONS
If one player’s army has slain all of its foes, they win a major victory. Otherwise, the player who has the most victory points wins a major victory. If two or more players are tied for the highest number of victory points, the one with the lowest rank wins a minor victory. Victory points are achieved for the following:

Dominate the Field: At the end of each battle round, the objective marker is worth 1 victory point to the player who controls it – keep a running score from battle round to battle round. A player controls the objective marker if there are more models from their army within 3" of the centre of the marker than there are enemy models.

Campaigns

Taking you beyond one-off battles, campaigns can add a new dimension to your gaming, giving each victory and defeat greater meaning. Essentially, they tell a story that unfolds with every new engagement, where the result of each battle will be affected by the one before and influence the one after.

Once you fight a number of battles with your army, you’re likely to find that a narrative develops out of the action on the battlefield. Perhaps one unit gains a reputation for surviving against the odds, or one of your Characters begins a bitter rivalry with one from an army they face regularly.

Campaigns are a great way of developing this natural narrative, providing it with a clearly defined structure and giving each battle you fight greater meaning. In essence, a campaign is simply a series of battles that are linked by a mechanism such as a map, flowchart or overarching story. Campaigns offer a style of gaming where armies gain battle honours and commanders hone their skills as the action progresses.

As you play and progress through the campaign, you will get to know and anticipate the strengths, weaknesses and strategies of your fellow players. Friendly rivalries abound, and are all part of the fun – as well as giving you the opportunity to capitalise on your victories, campaigns also allow you to seek retribution for your defeats!

A campaign can be as small or as extensive as you like. For instance, you could pitch your army against that of a friend and spend a day playing a short campaign that encompasses a skirmish, an epic main battle and a desperate last stand. Several friends could use a campaign as motivation for building their armies, where each week the players add a new unit to their forces and play again. There are many different types of campaign, but here are some examples of the most common kinds.

Tree Campaigns

Tree campaigns are a series of linked games, with the outcome of each one affecting the conditions of the next. For example, a simple tree campaign could consist of three battles (see above). In the first, one army is patrolling its territory (the defender), while the other must silence the patrols to gain the advantage (the attacker). If the attacking player wins the battle, the next mission sees them use this advantage to ambush the defender’s forces. If the defender wins the first battle, the next mission is a rescue, as the attacker has to make a daring strike to retrieve the lone survivor of that failed first mission. The result of the second battle will determine which mission is played next, and the winner of that mission wins the campaign!

Matrix Campaigns

Matrix campaigns require forward planning, with each battle affected by the choices you make at the start. They give you the opportunity to outmanoeuvre your foe in a series of linked games, using guile to win the day, but the mechanics are quite simple. Each player secretly picks an option from a list before each battle – the different choices will come together on the matrix to determine which mission to use. Below is an example that you could use to decide not only the mission you play, but which player has managed to gain an advantage over their opponent. You could use this matrix multiple times in the same campaign, or design your own with your opponent for the engagements that you fight later in the campaign, with additional bonuses or penalties.

Map Campaigns

Map campaigns provide a dynamic geographical setting for your battles which you can explore as the campaign progresses. Each player might start with their own territory, marked out on a grid or even a Realm of Battle board modelled to represent the contested world. As battles are won and lost, territory might be taken over, key assets might be seized, and empires carved out that will be forever remembered. The action might not be restricted to battles – you can always write rules for supply lines, reinforcements, natural disasters and so on!

The Next Step

Once you have developed a taste for campaigning, you can make use of increasingly complex systems – some of these methods can be combined for an even more engaging experience. For example, you can incorporate a matrix into a map campaign and use your knowledge of the terrain to make the best strategical choices.

If you’re new to campaigning, however, it’s best to start small. While it’s tempting to set your sights on conquering an entire star system, a set of linked battles with a manageable objective such as a capturing an outpost is perfect. On the other hand, if you’ve already enjoyed battling your way through a few games, then dive straight into an epic narrative campaign. This is the perfect forum for unleashing your creative talents, and provides great motivation to finish painting those final units or even build a whole new tabletop battlefield replete with sturdy fortifications, outlandish flora and all the scars of a protracted and hard-fought war.

Campaigns can become great multiplayer battles where pacts are formed and armies expand as the sagas unfold. In fact, stories are at the heart of every successful campaign, and when combined with a sound framework and organisation, they provide the excitement and interest that keeps everyone motivated to win.
WARLORD A
WARLORD BWARLORD’S
CHOICE
AdvanceHoldReconnoitreFlankReinforce
AdvanceRetrieval MissionBlitz (Warlord B is the Attacker)Patrol (Warlord B is the Attacker)Ambush! (Warlord A is the Attacker)No Mercy
HoldBlitz (Warlord A is the Attacker)DeadlockCleanse and CaptureMeat Grinder (Warlord B is the Attacker)Meat Grinder (Warlord A is the Attacker)
ReconnoitrePatrol (Warlord A is the Attacker)Cleanse and CapturePatrol (choose Attacker randomly)The ScouringSabotage (Warlord B is the Attacker)
FlankAmbush! (Warlord B is the Attacker)Meat Grinder (Warlord A is the Attacker)The ScouringCloak and ShadowsAmbush! (Warlord B is the Attacker)
ReinforceNo MercyMeat Grinder (Warlord B is the Attacker)Sabotage (Warlord A is the Attacker)Ambush! (Warlord A is the Attacker)Tactical Escalation
Re-rolls
Some rules allow you to re-roll a dice roll, which means you get to roll some or all of the dice again. If a rule allows you to re-roll a result that was made by adding several dice together (e.g. 2D6, 3D6, etc.) then, unless otherwise stated, you must roll all of those dice again. You can never re-roll a dice more than once, and re-rolls happen before modifiers (if any) are applied.
Morale Test

Even the bravest heart may quail when the horrors of battle take their toll.

In the Morale phase, starting with the player whose turn it is, players must take Morale tests for units from their army that have had models slain during the turn.

To take a Morale test, roll a dice and add the number of models from the unit that have been slain this turn. If the result of the Morale test exceeds the highest Leadership characteristic in the unit, the test is failed. For each point that the test is failed by, one model in that unit must flee and is removed from play. You choose which models flee from the units you command.
Invulnerable Saves
Some models possess supernatural reflexes or are protected by force fields that grant them an invulnerable save. Each time a wound is allocated to a model with an invulnerable save, you can choose to use either its normal Save characteristic or its invulnerable save, but not both. If a model has more than one invulnerable save, it can only use one of them – choose which it will use. If you use a model’s invulnerable save, it is never modified by a weapon’s Armour Penetration value.
Terrain and Cover
The battlefields of the far future are littered with terrain features such as ruins, craters and twisted copses. Models can take shelter within such terrain features to gain protection against incoming weapons’ fire.

If a unit is entirely on or within any terrain feature, add 1 to its models’ saving throws against shooting attacks to represent the cover received from the terrain (invulnerable saves are unaffected). Units gain no benefit from cover in the Fight phase.
Advancing
When you pick a unit to move in the Movement phase, you can declare that it will Advance. Roll a dice and add the result to the Move characteristics of all models in the unit for that Movement phase. A unit that Advances can’t shoot or charge later that turn.
Wound Roll
WOUND ROLL
ATTACK’S STRENGTH VS TARGET’S TOUGHNESSD6 ROLL REQUIRED
Is the Strength
TWICE (or more)
than the Toughness?
2+
Is the Strength
GREATER
than the Toughness?
3+
Is the Strength
EQUAL
to the Toughness?
4+
Is the Strength
LOWER
than the Toughness?
5+
Is the Strength
HALF (or less)
than the Toughness?
6+
If an attack scores a hit, you will then need to roll another dice to see if the attack successfully wounds the target. The roll required is determined by comparing the attacking weapon’s Strength characteristic with the target’s Toughness characteristic, as shown on the table to the right:

If the roll is less than the required number, the attack fails and the attack sequence ends. A roll of 1 always fails, irrespective of any modifiers that may apply.
Mortal Wounds
Some attacks inflict mortal wounds – these are so powerful that no armour or force field can withstand their fury. Each mortal wound inflicts one point of damage on the target unit. Do not make a wound roll or saving throw (including invulnerable saves) against a mortal wound – just allocate it as you would any other wound and inflict damage to a model in the target unit as described above. Unlike normal attacks, excess damage from attacks that inflict mortal wounds is not lost. Instead keep allocating damage to another model in the target unit until either all the damage has been allocated or the target unit is destroyed.
Hit Roll
Each time a model makes an attack, roll a dice. If the roll is equal to or greater than the attacking model’s Ballistic Skill characteristic, then it scores a hit with the weapon it is using. If not, the attack fails and the attack sequence ends. A roll of 1 always fails, irrespective of any modifiers that may apply.
Characters
Some models are noted as being a Character on their datasheet. These heroes, officers, prophets and warlords are powerful individuals that can have a great impact on the course of a battle. The swirling maelstrom of the battlefield can make it difficult to pick out such individuals as targets, however.

An enemy CHARACTER with a Wounds characteristic of less than 10 can only be chosen as a target in the Shooting phase if it is both visible to the firing model and it is the closest enemy unit to the firing model. Ignore other enemy CHARACTERS with a Wounds characteristics of less than 10 when determining if the target is the closest enemy unit to the firing model.

This means that if any other enemy units (other than other CHARACTERS with a Wounds characteristics of less than 10) are closer, whether they are visible or not, then the enemy CHARACTER cannot be targeted.
Psyker
Some models are noted as being a Psyker on their datasheet. Psykers can manifest their otherworldly abilities and attempt to deny enemy sorceries. The powers a psyker knows, and the number of powers they can attempt to manifest or deny each Psychic phase, are detailed on their datasheet.
Psychic Test
A psyker can attempt to manifest a psychic power they know by taking a Psychic test. To do so, roll 2D6. If the total is equal to or greater than that power’s warp charge value, the power is successfully manifested. A psyker cannot attempt to manifest the same psychic power more than once in a turn.
Deny the Witch Test
A psyker can attempt to resist a psychic power that has been manifested by an enemy model within 24" by taking a Deny the Witch test – this takes place immediately, even though it is not your turn. To do so, roll 2D6. If the total is greater than the result of the Psychic test that manifested the power, it has been resisted and its effects are negated. Only one attempt to deny each successfully manifested psychic power can be made each turn, regardless of the number of psykers you have within 24" of the enemy model manifesting the psychic power.
Perils of the Warp
If you roll a double 1 or a double 6 when taking a Psychic test, the psyker immediately suffers Perils of the Warp. The psyker suffers D3 mortal wounds as the forces of the Daemon-haunted warp claw at their mind. If the psyker is slain by Perils of the Warp, the power they were attempting to manifest automatically fails and each unit within 6" immediately suffers D3 mortal wounds, as the psyker is dragged into the warp or else detonates in a burst of empyric feedback.
HEAVY

Heavy weapons are the biggest and deadliest guns on the battlefield, but require reloading, careful set-up or bracing to fire at full effect.

If a model with a Heavy weapon moved in its preceding Movement phase, you must subtract 1 from any hit rolls made when firing that weapon this turn.
GRENADE

Grenades are handheld explosive devices that a warrior throws at the enemy while their squad mates provide covering fire.

Each time a unit shoots, a single model in the unit that is equipped with Grenades may throw one instead of firing any other weapon.
Roll-offs
Some rules instruct players to roll off. To do so, both players roll a D6, and whoever scores highest wins the roll-off. In the case of a tie, both players re-roll their D6; this is the only time players can reroll a re-roll – if the second and subsequent rolls are also tied, keep on rolling until a winner is decided.
Heroic Intervention
After the enemy has completed all of their charge moves, any of your Characters that are within 3" of an enemy unit may perform a Heroic Intervention. Any that do so can move up to 3", so long as they end the move closer to the nearest enemy model.
© Vyacheslav Maltsev 2013-2018