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Contents
• Weapons
• Moving
• Fly
◦ Retreat
• Psybolt
◦ Targets
◦ ASSAULT
◦ HEAVY
◦ GRENADE
◦ PISTOL
• Terrain
• Falling

CORE RULES

Kill Team puts each player in command of a force of hand-picked fighters tasked with a vital mission. The core rules on these pages contain everything you need to know in order to use your Citadel Miniatures to wage covert war against one or more opponents for control of the battlefields of the 41st Millennium.


Tools of War

In order to play a game of Kill Team, you will need your Citadel Miniatures, a tape measure, a playing surface (which could simply be a table), and some dice. You may also find it helpful to have tokens that you can use to show when your models have acted – these are available in a number of Kill Team products.

Distances in Kill Team are measured in inches (") between the closest points of the bases of the models you’re measuring to and from. An object (such as a model) is said to be within a certain range (e.g. 6") of something if the distance to that thing is that range or less. So, for example, a model is within 6" of another model as long as it is 6" or less from that model. If a model does not have a base, measure to and from the closest point of that model instead. You can measure distances whenever you wish.

Most games of Kill Team are played on an area of 30" by 22", which is the size of the gameboard included in the boxed game. You can play games of Kill Team on a playing surface of any size, though if it is any smaller than 24" by 24" you may find it feels a bit cramped!

Kill Team uses six-sided dice, sometimes abbreviated to D6. Some rules refer to 2D6, 3D6 and so on – in such cases, roll that many D6s and add the results together. If a rule requires you to roll a D3, roll a D6 and halve the result. When halving any dice roll, round fractions up before applying modifiers (if any) to the result. All modifiers are cumulative. Some rules refer to an ‘unmodified roll’ – this means the result shown by the dice, before any modifiers are applied.

If a rule requires a dice roll of, for example, 3 or more, this is often abbreviated to 3+.

Fighting a Battle

Once you have your tools of war, you’ll need to choose a mission to play. There is a mission included in these core rules – Covert War – but there are others in this book and available in other Kill Team products, and you can even make up your missions. The mission you play may have a bearing on which Citadel Miniatures you use or how you set up the battlefield. For more information about the different kinds of missions and choosing one to play, see Missions.

Kill Teams, Enemy Models and Players

The models that a player brings to a game of Kill Team are collectively known as that player’s kill team. There are rules for choosing which models are included in your kill team – these are found on this page. These rules may be influenced by the mission you have chosen to play. All models in the same kill team are referred to as ‘friendly models’, while all other models are referred to as ‘enemy models’. All other players are referred to as ‘opponents’ or ‘enemy players’.

A player is said to be ‘controlling’ the models in their kill team, and may be referred to as the ‘controlling player’ in the rules that follow.

Random Determination

Some rules or abilities will ask you to randomly determine something, usually a model from a kill team. You may do this in a variety of ways, but the simplest is to assign a number to each and roll a number of D6 (or D10 – that is, ten-sided dice), re-rolling any results not assigned to an eligible model. For example, if you need to randomly select a model from a kill team of 5, you would assign each model a number from 1 to 5 and roll a D6, re-rolling any results of 6. If the group you’re randomising is larger than 10, simply split the group into 2 or more smaller groups (of no more than 10), randomly determine one of those groups and then randomly determine the result within that group.

Datasheets and Weapons

The characteristics of models are described on datasheets, which you will need in order to use them in battle. This book includes all the datasheets you need to play Kill Team, and the details of the weapons used on the battlefield. Here we explain the information found on datasheets and in weapon profiles.


1. Model Name

Here you’ll find the name of the model.

2. Profiles

These contain the following characteristics that tell you how mighty models (and their variants) are:

Move (M): This is the speed at which a model moves across the battlefield.

Weapon Skill (WS): This tells you a model’s skill at hand-to-hand fighting. If a model has a Weapon Skill of ‘-’ it is unable to fight in melee and cannot make close combat attacks at all.

Ballistic Skill (BS): This shows how accurate a model is when shooting with ranged weapons. If a model has a Ballistic Skill of ‘-’ it has no proficiency with ranged weapons and cannot make shooting attacks at all.

Strength (S): This indicates how strong a model is and how likely it is to inflict damage in hand-to-hand combat.

Toughness (T): This reflects the model’s resilience against physical harm.

Wounds (W): Wounds show how much damage a model can sustain before it succumbs to its injuries.

Attacks (A): This tells you how many times a model can strike blows in hand-to-hand combat.

Leadership (Ld): This reveals how courageous, determined or self-controlled a model is.

Save (Sv): This indicates the protection a model’s armour gives.

Maximum Number (Max): This number tells you how many of this model you can include in a kill team.

3. Description

This tells you what the model is armed with. All weapons have a profile described later in the same section of the book as the datasheet. Some datasheets have variant models with their own profiles, and where this is the case they will be described here.

4. Wargear Options

Some models have the option to exchange the wargear listed in their description for other options. Where that is the case, the options will be listed here.

5. Abilities

Many models have exciting special abilities that are not covered by the core rules: these will be described here.

6. Specialists

You can choose for some of the models in your kill team to be specialists. This section of a datasheet tells you what kind of specialist each model can be.

7. Keywords

All datasheets have a list of keywords, sometimes separated into Faction keywords and other keywords. The former can be used as a guide to help decide which models to include in your kill team, but otherwise both sets of keywords are functionally the same. Sometimes a rule will say that it applies to models that have a specific keyword. For example, a rule might say that it applies to ‘all ADEPTUS ASTARTES models’. This means it would only apply to models that have the Adeptus Astartes keyword on their datasheet.

Weapons

The weapons that the models in Kill Team use are described using a set of characteristics as follows:

Range: How far the weapon can shoot. Weapons with a Range of ‘Melee’ can only be used in hand-to-hand combat. All other weapons are referred to as ranged weapons.

Type: These are all explained under the Shooting and Fight phases of the core rules.

Strength (S): How likely the weapon is to inflict damage. If a weapon’s Strength lists ‘User’, it is equal to the wielder’s current Strength. If a weapon lists a modifier such as ‘+1’ or ‘x2’, you should modify the user’s current Strength characteristic as shown to determine the weapon’s Strength. For example, if a weapon’s Strength was ‘x2’, and the user had a Strength characteristic of 6, that weapon has Strength 12.

Armour Penetration (AP): How good it is at getting through armour.

Damage (D): The amount of damage inflicted by a successful hit.

Abilities: Some weapons have additional abilities that change how they are used or what happens when they are used. Where this is the case, it will be described here.

All of a model’s weapons are described later in this book, in the appendix for that model’s Faction.

Modifying Characteristics

You may encounter abilities and rules that modify a characteristic. All modifiers are cumulative, though you should apply any multiplication or division to the characteristic (rounding fractions up) before applying any addition or subtraction.

You may also encounter a characteristic that is a random value instead of a number. For example, a Move characteristic might be 2D6", or an Attacks value might be D6. Roll to determine this value each time the model uses that characteristic (e.g. when it moves or makes attacks). Note that, regardless of the source, characteristics of ‘-’ can never be modified, and the Strength, Toughness and Leadership characteristics of a model can never be modified below 1.

Points and Force

Each model and each piece of wargear has a points cost, as listed in each Faction’s section later in the book. These points costs are used when choosing a Battle-forged kill team, and the total points costs of all the models and wargear in your kill team is known as its ‘Force’. A kill team’s Force gives a value to a kill team that represents its strength, and is used when players are choosing kill teams of equal (or particular) strengths.

Aura Abilities

Some models have abilities that affect certain models within a given range. Unless the ability in question says otherwise, a model with a rule like this is always within range of the effect. For example, an Acolyte Hybrid with a cult icon gains the Cult Icon ability, which allows re-rolls on hit rolls of 1 for friendly models within 6". As the Acolyte Hybrid is always within 6" of itself, it benefits from this ability as well.

THE BATTLE ROUND

Each Kill Team mission is played in a series of battle rounds. During each battle round, all players act in an order determined in the Initiative phase. Each battle round consists of a series of phases, which must be resolved in order.

The phases are as follows:

1. Initiative phase
The players roll off to determine who will act first in each phase.

2. Movement phase
Players move any models that are capable of doing so, and may charge their enemies.

3. Psychic phase
Psykers can use powerful mental abilities.

4. Shooting phase
Models may shoot at enemy models.

5. Fight phase
Models pile in and attack with melee weapons.

6. Morale phase
Players test to see if their kill team is broken and if their models keep their nerve.

Once these phases have been played, the battle round has been completed and the next one begins, and so on, until the battle is concluded.

1. INITIATIVE PHASE

Victory in war can be decided in a split second, a moment in which one side gains the upper hand.

In the Initiative phase, the players each roll 2D6. The players’ results determine who has the first turn in each phase in this battle round, with the highest scorer taking the first turn, the next highest taking the second turn and so on. The player with the first turn is referred to as the player with the initiative. Any players who roll the same result should roll their dice again to determine which of them has a turn before the other(s). Once the player order has been established, the Initiative phase ends and the Movement phase begins.

Re-rolls

Some rules allow you to re-roll a dice roll, which means you get to roll some or all of the dice again. If a rule allows you to re-roll a result that was made by adding several dice together (2D6, 3D6 etc.) then, unless otherwise stated, you must roll all of those dice again. You can never re-roll a dice more than once, and re-rolls happen before modifiers (if any) are applied.

Roll-offs

Some rules instruct players to roll off. To do so, each player rolls a D6 (or 2D6 if there are more than two players), and whoever scores highest wins the roll-off. In the case of a tie, those players re-roll their dice – if the second and subsequent rolls are also tied, keep on rolling until a winner is determined; this is the only time players can re-roll a re-roll.

Sequencing

You’ll occasionally find that two or more rules are to be resolved at the same time – normally ‘at the start of the Movement phase’ or ‘before the battle begins’. When this happens, the player who has the initiative chooses the order. If these things occur before or after the game, or before the player with the initiative for the battle round is decided, the players roll off and the winner decides in what order the rules are resolved.

At the Beginning of the Phase...

Some rules or abilities refer to the beginning or end of a phase. Rules or abilities used at the beginning of the phase are used before any player’s turn in that phase. Rules or abilities used at the end of the phase are used after all players’ turns in that phase.

2.MOVEMENT PHASE

Warriors move carefully towards their objective, advance quickly across the battlefield, or charge their enemies even as their comrades prepare to unleash covering fire.

In the Movement phase, each player will take it in turn to move all of the models in their kill team that they wish to move, following the order determined in the Initiative phase. Once a player has moved all of the models they want to, the next player does the same, and so on until all players have moved all of the models they wish to move. Once all players have done so, the Movement phase ends and the Psychic phase begins.

When it is your turn, pick a model from your kill team and move it. You can then pick another model from your kill team to move, until you have moved as many of the models in your kill team as you wish. No model can be moved more than once in each Movement phase – if you have Kill Team tokens, place a token next to each model you move as a reminder.

Moving

You can change the position of a model on the battlefield by making a move with the model. Models can be moved in the Movement phase and the Fight phase, and some abilities may allow a model to make a move in other phases too.

Whenever you move a model, it can be moved in any direction or combination of directions, but cannot be moved across other models or their bases, nor can it cross the edge of the battlefield. You can pivot the model at the end of the move so that it is facing in any direction. The distance a model moves is measured using the part of the model’s base that moves furthest from its starting position (including any pivots). If the model has no base, measure the move using whichever part of the model moves furthest from its starting position. A model that only pivots is still considered to have moved. A model must end its move on a surface it can stand on (though see Wobbly Model Syndrome).

Moving Over Terrain

Unless stated otherwise, a model can be moved over a piece of terrain but not through it (so models cannot move through a wall or a wreck, but can climb up or over them). A model can be moved vertically in order to climb or cross a piece of terrain, counting the vertical distance up and/or down as part of its move.

Fly

If the datasheet for a model says it can FLY (i.e. it has the FLY keyword), it can move across models and terrain – other than impassable terrain – as if they were not there, though it must end its move on a surface it can stand on, other than another model or another model’s base. Do not measure vertical distance when moving a model that can FLY.

Normal Move

Most moves made in the Movement phase are called normal moves. A model making a normal move can move a distance equal to or less than its Move characteristic.

Enemy Models

When you make a normal move (or Advance) with a model, it may not be moved within 1" of any enemy models. When you pick a model to move, if it is within 1" of any enemy models, it cannot make a normal move (or Advance).

Falling Back

When you pick a model to move, if that model started the Movement phase within 1" of an enemy model, it cannot make a normal move. Instead, it can either remain stationary or Fall Back. A model cannot Fall Back if an enemy model finished a charge move within 1" of it in the same phase. If you choose to Fall Back, the model can move a distance equal to or less than its Move characteristic, but must end its move more than 1" away from all enemy models. If a model Falls Back, it cannot Advance, charge, React or be Readied in that phase. A model that Falls Back also cannot shoot later that battle round unless it can FLY. If you have Kill Team tokens, place a Fall Back token next to the model as a reminder.

Advancing

When you pick a model to move, instead of making a normal move with that model you can declare that it will Advance, unless it is within 1" of an enemy model. If you do so, make an Advance roll by rolling a D6. Add the result to the model’s Move characteristic for that Movement phase. You can then move that model a distance equal to or less than its Move characteristic. A model that Advances cannot charge, React or shoot later that battle round. If you have Kill Team tokens, place an Advance token next to the model as a reminder.

Readying

When you pick a model to move, instead of making a normal move (including pivoting the model) you can Ready them, unless they are within 1" of an enemy model. A model that is Readied in the Movement phase has an advantage in the subsequent Shooting phase (see Ready, Fire!). If you have Kill Team tokens, place a Ready token next to the model as a reminder. If the model moves for any reason, it is no longer Readied – remove this token.

CHARGING

When you pick a model to move, if it is not within 1" of an enemy model and is within 12" of an enemy model, instead of making a normal move you can declare that it will attempt to charge. Follow the charge sequence below.

CHARGE SEQUENCE

1. Choose target(s)
2. Enemy Reacts
3. Roll 2D6 and make charge move

1. Choose Target(s)

Choose one or more enemy models within 12" of the charging model as the target(s) of the charge.

2. React

After you have declared a charge, any opponents take it in turn to make Reactions with any models from their kill teams that are allowed to do so, if they wish to do so, in the order determined in the Initiative phase. Once one opponent has resolved all of their models’ Reactions, the next player can do so, and so on.

A model can React if it is the target of a charging model and it is more than 1" from an enemy model. A model can either fire Overwatch or Retreat when it Reacts. If, at any point, the charging model is slain, no further Reactions can be made for this charge sequence.

Overwatch

Overwatch is a special type of shooting attack that is described here. A target model can potentially fire Overwatch several times in a battle round.

Retreat

A target model cannot Retreat if it has already made a move of any kind (or attempted to charge) in this phase. A model can Retreat if it has already fired Overwatch in this phase. When a model Retreats, it can be moved up to 3" by the controlling player. This move must end with the model further away from the charging model, and more than 1" from any other enemy models. A model that Retreats cannot React later in the battle round, and cannot shoot later in the battle round (unless it can FLY). If you have Kill Team tokens, place a Fall Back token next to the model as a reminder.

3. Make Charge Move

After all Reactions have been resolved, make a charge roll by rolling 2D6. The charging model can move up to this number of inches – this is their charge distance this turn. To make a successful charge roll, the model must finish its move within 1" of at least one of the target models. A model that does so is said to have charged, and the enemy models that are within 1" of it at the end of its move are said to have been charged. It cannot move within 1" of an enemy model that was not a target of its charge.

If the model cannot finish its move while following these restrictions, the charge fails and the model is not said to have charged – however, the model can move up to its charge distance, as long as that move takes it as close as possible to at least one of the targets of its charge, and not within 1" of any enemy models. A model can only make one charge attempt in each Movement phase, and once it has done so it cannot shoot later in the battle round. If you have Kill Team tokens, place a Charge token next to the model as a reminder.

The Most Important Rule

In a game as detailed and wide-ranging as Kill Team, there may be times when you are not sure exactly how to resolve a situation that has come up during play. When this happens, have a quick chat with your opponent(s) and apply the solution that makes the most sense to you (or seems the most fun!). If no single solution presents itself, you and your opponent(s) should roll off, and whoever rolls highest gets to choose what happens. Then you can get on with the game!

Wobbly Model Syndrome

Sometimes you may find that a particular piece of terrain makes it hard to put a model exactly where you want. If you delicately balance it in place, it is very likely to fall as soon as somebody nudges the table, leaving your model damaged or even broken. In cases like this, we find it is perfectly acceptable to leave the model in a safer position, as long as all players have agreed and know its ‘actual’ location. If, later on, an opponent is considering shooting the model, you will have to hold it back in the proper place so they can check if it is visible.

Reinforcements

Some models have the ability to be set up on the battlefield mid-battle round, sometimes by using teleporters, grav-chutes or other, more esoteric means. Typically, this happens at the end of the Movement phase, but it can also happen during other phases. Models that are set up in this manner cannot move further, Advance or charge during the battle round they arrive, though they can otherwise act normally (use psychic powers, shoot, etc.) for the rest of the battle round. Models that arrive as reinforcements count as having made a normal move for all rules purposes, such as shooting Heavy weapons. Any model that has not arrived on the battlefield by the end of the battle counts as having been taken out of action.

3. PSYCHIC PHASE

Warrior mystics and sorcerers wield the strange power of the warp to aid their allies and destroy their foes. Harnessing this force is not without risk, however, and with the smallest mistake, there can be horrendous consequences.

Some models are noted as being a PSYKER on their datasheet. Psykers can manifest their otherworldly abilities and attempt to deny enemy sorceries. In the Psychic phase, players take it in turn to choose a single psyker from their kill team with which to attempt to manifest one or more psychic powers, in the order determined in the Initiative phase. Each player can only choose a single psyker in each battle round, and once all players with any psykers have done so (or have decided not to), the Psychic phase ends and the Shooting phase begins. Each attempt to manifest a psychic power uses the following sequence.

PSYCHIC SEQUENCE

1. Choose power
2. Take Psychic test
3. Enemy takes Deny the Witch test
4. Resolve psychic power

1. Choose Power

First, declare the power that the psyker you have chosen will attempt to manifest. The powers a psyker knows, and the number of powers they can attempt to manifest or deny in each Psychic phase, are detailed on their datasheet. A psyker cannot attempt to manifest the same psychic power more than once in a battle round.

Psychic Powers

Unless stated otherwise, all psykers know the Psybolt psychic power, detailed below. Some know other powers instead of, or in addition to, Psybolt – the model’s datasheets and other supplementary rules you are using will make it clear which powers each psyker knows. If a psyker generates their powers before the battle, do so immediately before any players begin to deploy their kill team.

Psybolt

Psybolt has a warp charge value of 5. If manifested, the closest enemy model within 18" of and visible to the psyker suffers 1 mortal wound. If the result of the Psychic test was 11+, the target suffers D3 mortal wounds instead.

2. Take Psychic Test

You can attempt to manifest a psychic power with a psyker from your kill team by taking a Psychic test. To do so, roll 2D6. If the total is equal to or greater than that power’s warp charge value, the power is successfully manifested.

Perils of the Warp

If you roll a double 1 or a double 6 when taking a Psychic test, the psyker immediately suffers Perils of the Warp. The psyker suffers D3 mortal wounds. If the psyker is taken out of action by Perils of the Warp, the power they were attempting to manifest automatically fails and each model within 3" immediately suffers D3 mortal wounds.

3. Deny the Witch Tests

If there are any enemy psykers within 24" of a psyker that has manifested a psychic power, the controlling player can choose one of those models to take a Deny the Witch test to resist the psychic power. The number of times a psyker can make a Deny the Witch attempt in each battle round is specified on their datasheet. Only one model can take a Deny the Witch test for each psychic power that is manifested, regardless of the number of models that could make an attempt or the number of times each is allowed to try and Deny the Witch in each battle round.

If more than one player has an eligible model to take a Deny the Witch test, players take it in turn to choose a model from their kill team to take a Deny the Witch test with, or pass, in the order determined in the Initiative phase. If a player passes, it is the next player’s turn to choose, and so on until a player chooses a model to take a Deny the Witch test or all players with eligible models have passed.

To take a Deny the Witch test, roll 2D6. If the total is greater than the result of the Psychic test that manifested the power, it has been successfully resisted and its effects are negated.

4. Resolve Psychic Power

So long as the Psychic test was successful, the psyker was not taken out of action as a result of Perils of the Warp, and the attempt was not successfully resisted by a Deny the Witch test, then the controlling player may resolve the effect of the psychic power, which will be described in the power itself.

If the psyker can attempt to manifest more than one psychic power in each battle round, the controlling player may then attempt to manifest another psychic power with them, following the same sequence, until they cannot make any more attempts or do not wish to make any further attempts.

4. SHOOTING PHASE

Gun muzzles flare, shots ring out, and grenades crack as sentries are eliminated; lone operatives are picked off, or multiple combatants are mown down in sudden crossfires.

In the Shooting phase, players take it in turn to choose a model from their kill team to shoot with. The Shooting phase is split into two sections: in the first section Readied models shoot, and in the second section other models shoot. No model can be chosen to shoot more than once in a Shooting phase – if you have Kill Team tokens, place a Shoot token next to each model which shoots as a reminder.

Ready, Fire!

Readied models shoot before all other models. Players take it in turn to choose a Readied model from their kill team to shoot with (following the sequence below), or pass, in the order determined in the Initiative phase. If a player passes, it is the next player’s turn to choose. Once all players have done so, they do so again in the same order, until all players pass in succession. When all of the players pass in succession, the Ready, Fire! section of the Shooting phase is over.

Fire at Will

Once the Ready, Fire! section of the Shooting phase is over, players take it in turn to choose a model from their kill team to shoot with, or pass, in the order determined in the Initiative phase. If a player passes, it is the next player’s turn to choose. Once all players have done so, they do so again in the same order, until all players pass in succession. When all of the players pass in succession, the Shooting phase is over and the Fight phase begins.

Each shooting attack uses the following sequence:


1. Choose Model to Shoot With

When it is your turn, choose a model from your kill team to shoot with. You may not choose a model that has made a charge attempt, Advanced, Fallen Back (unless it can FLY) or Retreated this battle round, or a model that is within 1" of an enemy model. Unless otherwise stated, the model attacks with all of the ranged weapons it is armed with, one after the other.

2. Choose Ranged Weapon and Targets

Having chosen a shooting model, you must pick the ranged weapon it will use and the target model (or models, see Targets) for the attacks. The weapons a model has are listed on its datasheet.

Range and Visibility

In order for a shooting model to target an enemy model, the enemy model must be within the Range of the weapon being used (as listed on its profile) and be visible to the shooting model. If unsure, stoop down and get a look from behind the shooting model to see if any part of the target is visible from any part of the shooting model. Models cannot target enemy models that are within 1" of friendly models – the risk of hitting your own troops is too great.

Number of Attacks

Each time a model shoots a ranged weapon, it will make a number of attacks. You roll one dice for each attack being made. The number of attacks a model can make with a weapon, and therefore the number of dice you can roll, is found on the weapon’s profile, along with the weapon’s type. A weapon’s type can impact the number of attacks it can make (see Weapon Types).

Targets

If a weapon makes more than one attack, you can choose for the shooting model to make all of them against the same target, or to split them. If you choose to split its attacks, you must split them between an initial target model, chosen as described above, and any number of enemy models within 2" of that target that are also eligible targets. After determining the number of shots made (if necessary, see Weapon Types), declare how you will split the shooting model’s shots before making any hit rolls, and resolve all the shots against one target before moving on to the next.

For example, a Skitarii Vanguard is firing his radium carbine (an Assault 3 weapon, which means it fires three shots). He has two eligible targets, and they are within 2" of one another, so the controlling player decides that the Skitarii Vanguard will split his attacks. The player will make two attacks against one of the targets, and one attack against the other.

Fast Dice Rolling

The rules for resolving attacks have been written assuming you will make them one at a time. However, it is possible to speed up your battles by rolling the dice for similar attacks together. In order to make several attacks at once, all of the attacks must have the same Ballistic Skill (if it’s a shooting attack) or the same Weapon Skill (if it’s a close combat attack) and be subject to the same modifiers. They must also have the same Strength, Armour Penetration and Damage characteristics, and they must be directed at the same model. If this is the case, make all of the hit rolls at the same time, then all of the wound rolls. Your opponent can then make the saving throws one at a time and suffer damage each time as appropriate.

Weapon Types

There are five types of ranged weapon: Assault, Heavy, Rapid Fire, Grenade and Pistol. A model shooting one of these weapons can make a number of attacks equal to the number written on its profile after its type. For example, a model firing an ‘Assault 1’ weapon can make 1 attack with that weapon; a model firing a ‘Heavy 3’ weapon can make 3 attacks, etc.

Some weapons make a random number of attacks – D3 or D6, for example. Once a player has rolled to determine how many shots a weapon of this kind makes, they can choose a target or targets as normal.

Each type of ranged weapon also has an additional rule that, depending upon the situation, might affect the accuracy of the weapon or when it can be fired. These are as follows:

ASSAULT

Assault weapons fire so rapidly or indiscriminately that they can be shot from the hip as warriors dash forwards into combat.

You can choose to shoot with a model with an Assault weapon in the Shooting phase (or React with that model to fire Overwatch) even if it Advanced earlier in that battle round. If it does so, it can only fire Assault weapons, and you must subtract 1 from any hit rolls made when firing that weapon this battle round.

HEAVY

Heavy weapons are the biggest and deadliest guns on the battlefield, but require reloading, careful set-up or bracing to fire at full effect.

If a model with a Heavy weapon moved in the preceding Movement phase, you must subtract 1 from any hit rolls made when firing that weapon this battle round.

RAPID FIRE

Rapid Fire weapons are capable of single aimed shots at long range and controlled bursts at close quarters.

A model firing a Rapid Fire weapon doubles the number of attacks it makes if all of its targets are within half the weapon’s Range characteristic.

GRENADE

Grenades are handheld explosive devices that a warrior throws at the enemy while their squad mates provide covering fire.

A model in your kill team armed with a Grenade weapon may fire it in Overwatch or in the Shooting phase. If they do so, they cannot fire any other weapons that phase, and no other model in your kill team can fire a Grenade weapon that phase.

PISTOL

Pistols are carried one-handed and can even be used in a melee to shoot at point-blank range.
You can choose to shoot with a model with a Pistol weapon even if there are enemy models within 1", but it must target the closest enemy model (you can choose which if two or more are equidistant) and can only shoot with its Pistol weapon(s). In such circumstances, the model can shoot its Pistol even if other friendly models are within 1" of the same enemy model. It cannot fire a Pistol if it was charged in this battle round.

Each time a model armed with both a Pistol and another type of ranged weapon (e.g. a Pistol and a Rapid Fire weapon) is chosen to shoot, it can either shoot with its Pistol(s) or with all of its other weapons. Choose which it will fire (Pistols or non-Pistols) before making hit rolls.

3. Resolve Attacks

Attacks can be made one at a time, or, in some cases, you can roll for multiple attacks together. The following sequence is used to make attacks one at a time:

1. Hit Roll

To see if an attack hits the target, roll a D6 and apply the following cumulative modifiers:

HIT ROLL MODIFIERS
Target model is at long range-1
Target model is obscured-1
Each flesh wound on the attacking model-1
Attacking model’s kill team is broken-1

If the result is equal to or greater than the attacking model’s Ballistic Skill characteristic, then it scores a hit with the weapon it is using. If not, the attack fails and the attack sequence ends. An unmodified hit roll of 1 always fails, and an unmodified hit roll of 6 always hits.

Obscured

Other models (even friendly models) and terrain may hide a target from view. If the target of an attack is even partially obscured from the best point of view of the firing model (that is, the point of view from a part of the firing model that gives the clearest line of sight), then it is said to be obscured.

When checking to see if a target is obscured, consider the main body of the firing and target models – do not include a model’s base or parts that are ‘sticking out’ like aerials or weapons, but do include all limbs and a model’s head. If there is still doubt, we recommend the players agree about what constitutes the main body of a model before the battle begins.

Long Range

A target is at long range if it is more than half the weapon’s Range characteristic away from the attacking model. Grenade weapons are not affected by this rule.

For example, a boltgun has a Range of 24". Any target that is more than 12" away from a model attacking with a boltgun is at long range.

2. Wound Roll

If an attack scores a hit, you will then need to roll another dice to see if the attack wounds the target. The roll required is determined by comparing the attacking weapon’s Strength characteristic with the target’s Toughness characteristic, as shown on the following table:

WOUND ROLL
ATTACK’S STRENGTH VS TARGET’S TOUGHNESSD6 ROLL REQUIRED
Is the Strength
TWICE (or more)
than the Toughness?
2+
Is the Strength
GREATER
than the Toughness?
3+
Is the Strength
EQUAL
to the Toughness?
4+
Is the Strength
LOWER
than the Toughness?
5+
Is the Strength
HALF (or less)
than the Toughness?
6+


If the roll is equal to or greater than the required number, the attack succeeds and the attack sequence continues. If the roll is less than the required number, the attack fails and the attack sequence ends. An unmodified wound roll of 1 always fails and an unmodified wound roll of 6 is always successful.

3. Saving Throw

The player controlling the target model then makes a saving throw by rolling a D6 and modifying the roll by the Armour Penetration characteristic of the attacking weapon. For example, if the attacking weapon has an Armour Penetration of -1, then 1 is subtracted from the saving throw. If the result is equal to, or greater than, the Save characteristic of the target model, then the damage is prevented and the attack sequence ends. If the result is less than the model’s Save characteristic, then the saving throw fails and the model suffers damage. An unmodified saving throw of 1 always fails.

4. Inflict Damage

The damage inflicted is equal to the Damage characteristic of the weapon used in the attack. A model loses one wound for each point of damage it suffers. If a model’s wounds are reduced to 0, any attacks still allocated to this model are not resolved, and then the player controlling the attacking model makes an Injury roll for the target model.

Overwatch

Overwatch is a special type of shooting attack, made by a model that is the target of a charge and resolved in the Movement phase. It uses all the normal rules for shooting (e.g. the target must be in range and visible when they declare the charge), except that any attacks made must target the model attempting to charge, and a 6 is always required for a successful hit roll, irrespective of the firing model’s Ballistic Skill or any modifiers.

Injury Roll

When a model’s wounds are reduced to 0, the controlling player (unless stated otherwise, e.g. Inflict Damage) makes an Injury roll for that model. To make an Injury roll, the player rolls a D6 and applies the following modifiers, depending on how the damage was caused:

PSYCHIC POWER/SHOOTING ATTACK INJURY
ROLL MODIFIERS
Injured model is obscured from the psyker/ shooting model, and within 1" of a model or piece of terrain that is between the two models-1
Each flesh wound on the injured model+1
CLOSE COMBAT ATTACK INJURY ROLL MODIFIER
Each flesh wound on the injured model+1
INJURY ROLL MODIFIER IN ANY OTHER CASE
Each flesh wound on the injured model+1

They then look up the result on the following table:

D3PSYCHIC POWER
3 or lessFlesh wound
4+Out of action

Flesh Wound

A model that suffers a flesh wound is restored to 1 wound remaining. A model with one or more flesh wounds suffers penalties to hit and is more likely to be taken out of action (see above). Mark one of the empty Flesh Wound boxes on that model’s datacard. If a model suffers a flesh wound and all of the Flesh Wound boxes on their datacard are marked, it is taken out of action instead. In the Morale phase each player takes Nerve tests for each of their models that has one or more flesh wounds.

Out of Action

A model that is taken out of action is seriously injured or may even be slain – either way it will play no further part in the battle. Remove that model from the battlefield.

Damage Characteristic

If a model loses its last wound to an attack that has a Damage characteristic of more than 1, the player whose model made the attack rolls a number of dice equal to that characteristic when making the Injury roll, rather than just one, and applies the highest result (after modifiers). If the attack has a Damage characteristic that is a random value (e.g. D3, D6), use the value rolled when inflicting damage.

For example, if a model with 3 wounds remaining fails its saving throw against a weapon with a Damage characteristic of 3, it will be reduced to 0 wounds and the player controlling the attacking model will roll three dice for the Injury roll, applying the highest result.

If a model loses its last wound when there are attacks or mortal wounds still allocated to it, these are not resolved.

4. Choose Another Ranged Weapon and Targets

If the attacking model has any other ranged weapons that it can fire, and you wish it to do so, return to step 2 of the shooting sequence. Otherwise, the shooting sequence ends.

Invulnerable Saves

Some models possess abilities or wargear, such as supernatural reflexes or force fields, that grant them an invulnerable save. Each time you are required to make a save roll for a model with an invulnerable save, you can choose to use either its normal Save characteristic or its invulnerable save, but not both. If you use a model’s invulnerable save, it is never modified (e.g. by a weapon’s Armour Penetration characteristic or by the Survivor ability) unless the modifier explicitly applies to invulnerable saves. If a model has more than one invulnerable save, it can only use one of them – choose which it will use.

Mortal Wounds

Some attacks inflict mortal wounds – these are so powerful that no armour or force field can withstand their fury. Each mortal wound inflicts one point of damage on the target model. Do not make a wound roll or saving throw (including invulnerable saves) against a mortal wound – just inflict damage to the model. If a mortal wound reduces a model to 0 wounds, any further mortal wounds directed against this model by this attack are not resolved and the player whose model caused the mortal wound makes an Injury roll for that model.

5. FIGHT PHASE

Warriors are silenced with a knife to the back, or cut down as their positions are overrun.

In the Fight phase, players take it in turn to choose a model from their kill team to fight with. The Fight phase is split into two sections: in the first section charging models fight, and in the second section other models fight. No model can be chosen to fight more than once in a Fight phase.

Hammer of Wrath

Models that charged in this battle round fight before all other models. Players take it in turn to choose a model that charged from their kill team to fight with (see below), or pass, in the order determined in the Initiative phase. If a player passes, it is the next player’s turn to choose. A player cannot choose to pass if they have a model that charged that can fight. Once all players have chosen a model from their kill team or passed, they do so again in the same order, until all players pass in succession. When they do so, the Hammer of Wrath section of the Fight phase is over.

Fight For Your Lives

Once the Hammer of Wrath section of the Fight phase is over, players take it in turn to choose a model from their kill team to fight with, or pass, in the order determined in the Initiative phase. If a player passes, it is the next player’s turn to choose. A player cannot choose to pass if they have a model that can fight. Once all players have chosen a model from their kill team or passed, they do so again in the same order, until all players pass in succession. When they do so, the Fight phase is over and the Morale phase begins.

Models that can Fight

Any model that charged or was charged in this battle round, or that is within 1" of an enemy model, can be chosen to fight in the Fight phase.

Each time a model fights, use the following sequence:

FIGHT SEQUENCE

1. Pile in up to 3"
2. Choose targets
3. Choose melee weapon
4. Resolve close combat attacks
 • Make hit roll
 • Make wound roll
 • Enemy makes saving throw
 • Inflict damage
5. Consolidate up to 3"

1. Pile In

You may move the model up to 3" – the model must end the move closer to the nearest enemy model.

2. Choose Targets

First, you must pick the target model, or models, for the attacks. To target an enemy model, the attacking model must be within 1" of that model, and the enemy model must be visible to the attacking model. Models that charged this battle round can only target enemy models that they charged or that charged them earlier in the battle round. If there are no valid targets, this fight sequence ends.

If a model can make more than one close combat attack (see Number of Attacks below), it can split them between eligible target models as you wish. Declare how you will split the model’s close combat attacks before any dice are rolled, and resolve all attacks against one target before moving on to the next.

Number of Attacks

The number of close combat attacks a model makes against its target is determined by its Attacks characteristic. You roll one dice for each close combat attack being made. For example, if a model has an Attacks characteristic of 2, it can make 2 close combat attacks and you can therefore roll 2 dice.

3. Choose Melee Weapon

Each time a model makes a close combat attack, it uses a melee weapon – the weapons a model is armed with are listed on its datasheet. In addition to the melee weapons listed on their datasheets, all models are also assumed to be able to fight with a close combat weapon, which has the following profile:

WEAPONRANGETYPESAPD
Close combat weaponMeleeMeleeUser01

If a model has more than one melee weapon, choose which it will use before rolling the dice. If a model has more than one melee weapon and can make several close combat attacks, it can split its attacks between these weapons however you wish – declare how you will divide the attacks before any dice are rolled.

4. Resolve Close Combat Attacks

Close combat attacks can be made one at a time, or in some cases you can roll the dice for a number of attacks together. The attack sequence for making close combat attacks is identical to that used for shooting attacks except you use the model’s Weapon Skill characteristic instead of its Ballistic Skill to make hit rolls, and apply the following cumulative modifiers to your hit rolls:

HIT ROLL MODIFIERS
There is intervening terrain-1
Each flesh wound on the attacking model-1
Attacking model’s kill team is broken-1

5. Consolidate

You may move the model up to 3" – the model must end the move closer to the nearest enemy model.

Intervening Terrain

There is said to be intervening terrain between an attacking model and its target if there is any terrain between the models that makes it impossible for the models to be placed in contact with each other.

6. MORALE PHASE

The bravest heart may quail when the horrors of battle take their toll, but some fighters will rally even in the greatest adversity.

In the Morale phase, players take it in turn to play through the following sequence, in the order determined in the Initiative phase:


Once the first player has played through this sequence, the next player does so, and so on until all players have done so. Once they have done so, the Morale phase and the battle round are over. The players remove any tokens from their models (other than Shaken tokens), and then the next battle round begins.

1. Check If Your Kill Team Is Broken

If all models in a kill team currently have flesh wounds, are shaken or are out of action, it is broken. Otherwise, if more than half of the models in your kill team currently have flesh wounds, are shaken or are out of action, it may be broken. Roll 2D6 – if the total is greater than the highest Leadership characteristic of any of the models in the kill team (other than those that are shaken or out of action), the kill team is broken. Once a kill team is broken, it stays broken for the rest of the game.

Models in a broken kill team need to take Nerve tests in each Morale phase. In addition, they suffer hit penalties as described in the Shooting and Fight phases, and there are additional penalties for broken kill teams in some missions.

2. Remove Shaken tokens

If you have any shaken models, they are now no longer shaken. Remove the Shaken token from each of these models.

3. Take Nerve Tests

You must take a Nerve test for each of your models that has a flesh wound, and for your other models if your kill team is broken. To take a Nerve test for a model, roll a D6 and apply the following cumulative modifiers:

NERVE TEST MODIFIERS
Each other friendly model that is shaken or is out of action+1
Each other friendly model (other than shaken models) within 2" of the model-1

If the result of the Nerve test exceeds the model’s Leadership characteristic, the test is failed. The model is shaken, and cannot do anything until it is no longer shaken: place a Shaken token next to it. Otherwise, the test is passed. The test is always passed on an unmodified roll of 1.

FIGHTING A BATTLE

In games of Kill Team, your hand-picked fighters will be tasked with a specific objective, whether this is to infiltrate enemy territory, sabotage critical resources or disrupt supply lines.


The Mission

Before you can fight a battle in a game of Kill Team, you must select a mission. The core rules include the Covert War mission which is ideal to get the action started quickly. Others can be found elsewhere in this book, in other books, or you could play a mission of your own creation. If you and your opponent(s) cannot agree on which mission to play, the players should roll off, and whoever wins decides on the mission. Alternatively, if you are playing a campaign, the campaign rules explain how to determine which mission you will play.

The Kill Teams

Once you have chosen which mission to play, you must choose your kill team. For the Covert War mission you can include any miniatures from your collection, but the full rules for choosing a kill team can be found here. The mission you are playing may include additional rules that change how you choose your kill team.

The Battlefield

In the far future, battles are fought across an infinite variety of strange and alien planets where no land is left untouched by the blight of war. Crystal moons, derelict space hulks and nightmarish Daemon worlds are just a few of the fantastical landscapes that can be recreated whenever you play a game of Kill Team.

Once you have chosen your mission and your kill teams, you must set up the battlefield. A battlefield can be any surface upon which the models can stand – a dining table, for example, or the floor. We typically assume a battlefield is 30" by 22" – the same size as a Kill Team gameboard – though some missions will state other dimensions. The battlefield should always be large enough to accommodate all your models – if it is not, simply increase the size of the battlefield. If you are playing a game with three or four players you may wish to increase the size of the battlefield to accommodate the extra models. This can be achieved by placing two Kill Team gameboards side by side, or by simply using a larger playing area.

Unless the mission you are playing instructs you otherwise, you should then create an exciting battlefield using any terrain features from your collection that you wish. The best games of Kill Team are played on battlefields that include a variety of terrain: some of it that can hide models from view, some of it that can be scaled to give models a better view of the battlefield, and some of it that provides a bit of cover for models dashing across otherwise open ground. In general, more is better, and we recommend having at least one, or preferably two, terrain features that can provide shelter for a handful of models or more in each 12" by 12" area (or each quarter of a 30" by 22" area).

Don’t worry if your battlefield doesn’t match these requirements, but keep in mind that playing on very small or very large battlefields, or ones that are either a barren wasteland or filled to overflowing with terrain features, may give an advantage to one side or the other.

Killzones & Expansions

If you are battling in a specific killzone (see Killzone: Sector Imperialis), or if you are using a particular expansion, there might be additional rules pertaining to setting up the battlefield, and special rules that alter how some terrain interacts with your warriors. Bear these in mind when creating your battlefield.

Scouting Phase

Once you have set up the battlefield, some missions will tell you to play the Scouting phase. This phase is described in detail further, but we suggest that you don't include this phase until after your first few games.

Deployment

Once you have set up the battlefield (and, if relevant, played the Scouting phase), it is time to set up your kill teams. Each mission will explain how to do this. Once the kill teams are set up as described in the mission (and after anything else that the mission specifies happens before the battle begins), begin the first battle round.

Open play mission

COVERT WAR

The time has come to prove your worth as the leader of a covert kill team. All that stands between you and success is another kill team determined to thwart you.

THE KILL TEAMS
To play this mission, each player must first choose a kill team from the miniatures in their collection. Any models can be included in the kill team. We recommend using 10 or fewer models in each kill team in this mission.

THE BATTLEFIELD
Create the battlefield and set up terrain. Then, the players each roll 2D6, re-rolling any tied scores. The highest scorer has the greatest strategic advantage in this mission, the next highest gets the second greatest advantage and so on.

The players then must take it in turn, in the order of greatest to least strategic advantage, to place a single objective marker to represent sites of tactical or strategic import. Each objective marker must be placed at least 8" away from any other objective marker and 6" from any battlefield edge. A player controls an objective marker if there are more models from their kill team within 2" of it than there are enemy models. Models that are shaken do not count. Whenever you measure to or from an objective marker, always measure to the centre of the marker.

The player with the greatest advantage then rolls on the primary objectives table to the right to determine which is used during the mission.

SCOUTING PHASE
If all players agree to do so, resolve the Scouting phase.

DEPLOYMENT
The player with least advantage divides the battlefield into as many equal-sized portions as there are players (so for a two-player game, they would divide it in half). The players then take it in turn, in the order of greatest to least advantage, to decide which portion is their own deployment zone.

The players then take it in turn to deploy one model from their kill team, starting with the player with least strategic advantage. Models must be set up wholly within their own deployment zone, more than 6" from any enemy deployment zone. Once all players have set up one model, they do so again in the same order, and so on. If a player runs out of models to set up, skip them. Once the players have set up all their models, deployment ends and the first battle round begins.

BATTLE LENGTH
The battle lasts for five battle rounds.

VICTORY CONDITIONS
At the end of the battle, the player who has the most victory points wins a major victory. If more than one player is tied for the most victory points at the end of the battle, the player amongst them who had the least strategic advantage wins a minor victory.

PRIMARY OBJECTIVES
D3VICTORY CONDITIONS
1Secure the Battlefield: At the end of the battle, each objective marker is worth 2 victory points to the player who controls it.
2Retrieve the Cache: At the start of the first battle round, but before the Initiatve phase begins, randomly select one objective marker; remove the other objective marker(s) from the battlefield. At the end of the battle, the remaining objective marker is worth 6 victory points to the player who controls it.
3Infiltrate: At the end of the battle, each objective marker in an opponent’s deployment zone is worth 2 victory points to the player who controls it. (A player can control an objective marker in their own deployment zone, but will score no victory points for doing so.)

ADVANCED RULES

This section includes a variety of rules which add further detail and complexity to the game. They are not necessary in order to play, so they have been gathered together here for players to use if they wish. We recommend that new players ignore this section to start with, until they are familiar with the core rules.


Terrain

You’ve already encountered some rules for terrain – a model shooting at a target that is obscured (which will often be by terrain) finds it harder to hit their target and may find it harder to take them out of action. This section introduces further rules for terrain, covering how your models move through different kinds of terrain and what effect the terrain has on them. Some of these rules override the core rules for movement, so make sure you have agreed with your opponent(s) whether or not you are using these rules before beginning your game.

Types of Terrain

Terrain is described as open ground, difficult terrain, dangerous terrain or impassable terrain. Each has a different impact on your models, as described below. The rules for some terrain features tell you which kind of terrain they are. For all other terrain, before the game begins but once terrain has been set up, you should agree with your opponent(s) what is considered to be open ground, what is difficult or dangerous terrain, and what is impassable.

Some types of terrain slow a model’s movement. Where this is the case, it applies to all of that model’s movement, whichever phase it occurs in. Where a model moves a random distance (for example, when charging), the value is determined normally and then affected as described below.

Open Ground

Open ground is terrain that is relatively flat and free of obstacles and hazards.

The battlefield surface, the floors of buildings and ruins, platforms, connecting walkways, doors, hatches and ladders are all considered to be open ground. Some windows may also be considered to be open ground for some smaller models – make sure you have discussed this with your opponent(s) before the game. Models can move across open ground without penalty.

Difficult Terrain

Difficult terrain is terrain where models might lose their footing, or have to scramble over obstacles.

Difficult terrain includes steep or treacherous slopes, dense stands of foliage, pools of non-hazardous liquid, and any surface where models might lose their footing – on ice or a spoil heap, for example. Models move over difficult terrain at half their normal rate, so 1" of movement across difficult terrain counts as 2". For example, to cross a stagnant pool 1½" wide would take 3" of movement. Similarly, if moving over a frozen lake, a model with a Move characteristic of 6" would only be able to move 3" rather than 6". This penalty applies to all moves. Models that can FLY ignore this penalty.

Dangerous Terrain

Dangerous terrain is terrain which is hazardous, and which might harm a model that moves through it.

Dangerous terrain includes tar pits, deep or noxious pools, and areas of sentient and predatory vegetation. Models move over dangerous terrain at half their normal rate in the same way as with difficult terrain, but as soon as they would move into dangerous terrain, or begin their move if they are already in dangerous terrain (unless they remain stationary), the controlling player takes a dangerous terrain test by rolling a D6. On a 1, that model suffers 1 mortal wound. Models that can FLY ignore the movement penalty, as with difficult terrain, but if they begin or end their move in dangerous terrain (unless they remain stationary), the controlling player takes a dangerous terrain test for that model.

Impassable Terrain

Impassable terrain is terrain that models cannot enter or move over for any reason – it might be instantly lethal to any who would enter, or simply a large, solid obstacle.

Models cannot move into impassable terrain.

Climbing

Models can climb or traverse barriers of 1" or higher, and when they do so you measure the distance as you would normally for the kind of terrain they are moving through. A model that climbs cannot end its movement while climbing – it must be standing on a surface at the end of its movement. If it does not have sufficient movement to climb to a suitable surface, it cannot climb. A model can traverse an overhang while climbing, as long as it protrudes less than 1" from the surface the model is climbing.

Models that can FLY ignore these rules – they can move vertically without measuring the distance moved.

Barriers, Gaps and Leaping

Walls, pipes, barricades and other low obstacles form barriers that a model can either go around or leap over. A model can leap onto a barrier less than 1½" high without having to include the vertical distance when determining how far they have moved. In addition, a model can leap over a barrier less than 1½" high and no more than 1½" deep without having to include the vertical distance when determining how far they have moved.

A model can also leap over a gap between two pieces of terrain (e.g. from one walkway to another), as long as the gap is less than 2" across, the model has sufficient movement to reach the other side of the gap (so that their base is entirely on the other side of the gap), and the model ends its move less than 1" higher than before it leapt. Note that if the model ends its move 6" or more lower than before it leapt, you will need to use the rules for jumping down (see below). When a model leaps, you do not have to include the vertical distance moved when determining how far the model has moved.

Models that can FLY ignore these rules – they can move over barriers and gaps without penalty.

Falling

Many terrain features have exposed edges, dangerous precipices, or precarious walkways. Before the game you should agree with your opponent(s) which terrain features it is possible for a model to fall from. Almost all buildings and ruins with more than one level are good examples of this.

Falling Tests

If a model is on such a terrain feature and within 1" of the edge when they are hit by an attack (or if something other than an attack causes them to lose a wound), they may be knocked off the edge. After all the attacks from the attacking model have been resolved against that model (or the wound has been lost and the Injury roll made if necessary), the player who controls that model takes a Falling test by rolling a D6. On a 2+, the test is passed and the model does not fall. On a 1, the test is failed and the model is knocked off the edge. Move the model over the edge by the shortest route possible, then straight down until they hit a lower level.

Falling Damage

Roll a D6 for every full 3" the model has fallen. For each roll of 5+ they suffer 1 mortal wound. If the falling model would be placed on top of another model, make another roll as described above for the model underneath, using the same number of dice as for the falling model. The controlling player of the falling model makes any Injury rolls that result from a fall. After resolving any Injury rolls, the falling model is placed as close as possible to the point where they would have landed. This can bring them within 1" of an enemy model.

Jumping Down

A model standing somewhere it could fall from can choose to jump down from one level to another. When they do so, use the normal falling rules but roll one fewer dice than you normally would. For example, if a model jumps down 5" you do not have to roll a dice for them; if they jump down 6", however, you would roll 1 dice for them. A model jumping down cannot choose to fall on top of another model, and cannot jump down within 1" of an enemy model, unless they are making a charge move and that model was a target of the charge.

KILLZONES

It is a vast galaxy, and wars are fought across all kinds of battlefields. From shattered city streets to sprawling refineries and shell-pocked plains, kill teams must contend not only with their foes, but also the environments in which they operate.

When you have chosen a mission for your game of Kill Team, you may decide that it is fought in a particular killzone. This book includes rules for one killzone – the Sector Imperialis – but rules for other killzones are available in other Kill Team products. Each killzone has its own rules that govern how your models interact with the battlefield and terrain, and these rules are used in addition to the rules for terrain.

In many cases the killzone you fight in will be determined by the gameboards and terrain in your collection, or by the mission you are playing. However, where you have a choice of killzones and the players cannot agree, the players should roll off. Whoever wins decides which killzone the battle is fought in.

Killzone: Sector Imperialis

Shattered streets and ruins stretch for miles in all directions. Kill teams must pick their way through the blasted remains of the lives of whatever luckless civilians dwelt here as they hunt for their objective.

If you are playing a mission in a Sector Imperialis, one player rolls a D6 once the battlefield has been set up but before kill teams are set up, and consults the environment table to the right to determine what additional rule is used for this mission. In addition, if you are playing a mission in a Sector Imperialis, players can use any Sector Imperialis Tactics they have (these can be found in other Kill Team products).

ENVIRONMENT TABLE
D6RESULT
1Deserted Habs: No additional rule.
2Abandoned Munitions: One extra model in each kill team can shoot with a Grenade weapon they are armed with in each battle round.
3Smoke in the Air: All players must subtract 1 from their hit rolls in the Shooting phase.
4Traps: The upper floors of ruins are dangerous terrain.
5Tunnels: If a model from your kill team begins your turn in the Movement phase within 1" of a manhole and more than 1" from any enemy models, and they are not shaken, they can enter the tunnels. When they do so, remove them from the battlefield. At the end of your turn in the Movement phase of the next battle round, you can place that model within 1" of any manhole that is within 24" of the manhole they used to enter the tunnels, and more than 1" from any enemy models. They are considered to have made a normal move. While they are not on the battlefield, they are considered to be out of action for the purposes of Nerve tests and checking whether your kill team is broken. If they are not on the battlefield at the end of the battle, they are considered to be out of action.
6Hidden Cache: In a campaign game, the player who wins the mission gains 1 Materiel. Otherwise, there is no additional rule.
Long Range
A target is at long range if it is more than half the weapon’s Range characteristic away from the attacking model. Grenade weapons are not affected by this rule.

For example, a boltgun has a Range of 24". Any target that is more than 12" away from a model attacking with a boltgun is at long range.
Obscured
Other models (even friendly models) and terrain may hide a target from view. If the target of an attack is even partially obscured from the best point of view of the firing model (that is, the point of view from a part of the firing model that gives the clearest line of sight), then it is said to be obscured.

When checking to see if a target is obscured, consider the main body of the firing and target models – do not include a model’s base or parts that are ‘sticking out’ like aerials or weapons, but do include all limbs and a model’s head. If there is still doubt, we recommend the players agree about what constitutes the main body of a model before the battle begins.
Flesh Wound
A model that suffers a flesh wound is restored to 1 wound remaining. A model with one or more flesh wounds suffers penalties to hit and is more likely to be taken out of action (see above). Mark one of the empty Flesh Wound boxes on that model’s datacard. If a model suffers a flesh wound and all of the Flesh Wound boxes on their datacard are marked, it is taken out of action instead. In the Morale phase each player takes Nerve tests for each of their models that has one or more flesh wounds.
Hit Roll
To see if an attack hits the target, roll a D6 and apply the following cumulative modifiers:

HIT ROLL MODIFIERS
Target model is at long range-1
Target model is obscured-1
Each flesh wound on the attacking model-1
Attacking model’s kill team is broken-1

If the result is equal to or greater than the attacking model’s Ballistic Skill characteristic, then it scores a hit with the weapon it is using. If not, the attack fails and the attack sequence ends. An unmodified hit roll of 1 always fails, and an unmodified hit roll of 6 always hits.
Advancing
When you pick a model to move, instead of making a normal move with that model you can declare that it will Advance, unless it is within 1" of an enemy model. If you do so, make an Advance roll by rolling a D6. Add the result to the model’s Move characteristic for that Movement phase. You can then move that model a distance equal to or less than its Move characteristic. A model that Advances cannot charge, React or shoot later that battle round. If you have Kill Team tokens, place an Advance token next to the model as a reminder.
Charge Move
After all Reactions have been resolved, make a charge roll by rolling 2D6. The charging model can move up to this number of inches – this is their charge distance this turn. To make a successful charge roll, the model must finish its move within 1" of at least one of the target models. A model that does so is said to have charged, and the enemy models that are within 1" of it at the end of its move are said to have been charged. It cannot move within 1" of an enemy model that was not a target of its charge.

If the model cannot finish its move while following these restrictions, the charge fails and the model is not said to have charged – however, the model can move up to its charge distance, as long as that move takes it as close as possible to at least one of the targets of its charge, and not within 1" of any enemy models. A model can only make one charge attempt in each Movement phase, and once it has done so it cannot shoot later in the battle round. If you have Kill Team tokens, place a Charge token next to the model as a reminder.
eact
After you have declared a charge, any opponents take it in turn to make Reactions with any models from their kill teams that are allowed to do so, if they wish to do so, in the order determined in the Initiative phase. Once one opponent has resolved all of their models’ Reactions, the next player can do so, and so on.

A model can React if it is the target of a charging model and it is more than 1" from an enemy model. A model can either fire Overwatch or Retreat when it Reacts. If, at any point, the charging model is slain, no further Reactions can be made for this charge sequence.
Readying
When you pick a model to move, instead of making a normal move (including pivoting the model) you can Ready them, unless they are within 1" of an enemy model. A model that is Readied in the Movement phase has an advantage in the subsequent Shooting phase (see Ready, Fire!). If you have Kill Team tokens, place a Ready token next to the model as a reminder. If the model moves for any reason, it is no longer Readied – remove this token.
Fly
If the datasheet for a model says it can FLY (i.e. it has the FLY keyword), it can move across models and terrain – other than impassable terrain – as if they were not there, though it must end its move on a surface it can stand on, other than another model or another model’s base. Do not measure vertical distance when moving a model that can FLY.
Ready, Fire!
Readied models shoot before all other models. Players take it in turn to choose a Readied model from their kill team to shoot with (following the sequence below), or pass, in the order determined in the Initiative phase. If a player passes, it is the next player’s turn to choose. Once all players have done so, they do so again in the same order, until all players pass in succession. When all of the players pass in succession, the Ready, Fire! section of the Shooting phase is over.
Overwatch
Overwatch is a special type of shooting attack, made by a model that is the target of a charge and resolved in the Movement phase. It uses all the normal rules for shooting (e.g. the target must be in range and visible when they declare the charge), except that any attacks made must target the model attempting to charge, and a 6 is always required for a successful hit roll, irrespective of the firing model’s Ballistic Skill or any modifiers.
Retreat
A target model cannot Retreat if it has already made a move of any kind (or attempted to charge) in this phase. A model can Retreat if it has already fired Overwatch in this phase. When a model Retreats, it can be moved up to 3" by the controlling player. This move must end with the model further away from the charging model, and more than 1" from any other enemy models. A model that Retreats cannot React later in the battle round, and cannot shoot later in the battle round (unless it can FLY). If you have Kill Team tokens, place a Fall Back token next to the model as a reminder.
Roll-offs
Some rules instruct players to roll off. To do so, each player rolls a D6 (or 2D6 if there are more than two players), and whoever scores highest wins the roll-off. In the case of a tie, those players re-roll their dice – if the second and subsequent rolls are also tied, keep on rolling until a winner is determined; this is the only time players can re-roll a re-roll.
HEAVY

Heavy weapons are the biggest and deadliest guns on the battlefield, but require reloading, careful set-up or bracing to fire at full effect.

If a model with a Heavy weapon moved in the preceding Movement phase, you must subtract 1 from any hit rolls made when firing that weapon this battle round.
Out of Action
A model that is taken out of action is seriously injured or may even be slain – either way it will play no further part in the battle. Remove that model from the battlefield.
Psychic Test
You can attempt to manifest a psychic power with a psyker from your kill team by taking a Psychic test. To do so, roll 2D6. If the total is equal to or greater than that power’s warp charge value, the power is successfully manifested.
Deny the Witch Test
If there are any enemy psykers within 24" of a psyker that has manifested a psychic power, the controlling player can choose one of those models to take a Deny the Witch test to resist the psychic power. The number of times a psyker can make a Deny the Witch attempt in each battle round is specified on their datasheet. Only one model can take a Deny the Witch test for each psychic power that is manifested, regardless of the number of models that could make an attempt or the number of times each is allowed to try and Deny the Witch in each battle round.

If more than one player has an eligible model to take a Deny the Witch test, players take it in turn to choose a model from their kill team to take a Deny the Witch test with, or pass, in the order determined in the Initiative phase. If a player passes, it is the next player’s turn to choose, and so on until a player chooses a model to take a Deny the Witch test or all players with eligible models have passed.

To take a Deny the Witch test, roll 2D6. If the total is greater than the result of the Psychic test that manifested the power, it has been successfully resisted and its effects are negated.
Psybolt
Psybolt has a warp charge value of 5. If manifested, the closest enemy model within 18" of and visible to the psyker suffers 1 mortal wound. If the result of the Psychic test was 11+, the target suffers D3 mortal wounds instead.
Mortal Wounds
Some attacks inflict mortal wounds – these are so powerful that no armour or force field can withstand their fury. Each mortal wound inflicts one point of damage on the target model. Do not make a wound roll or saving throw (including invulnerable saves) against a mortal wound – just inflict damage to the model. If a mortal wound reduces a model to 0 wounds, any further mortal wounds directed against this model by this attack are not resolved and the player whose model caused the mortal wound makes an Injury roll for that model.
Perils of the Warp
If you roll a double 1 or a double 6 when taking a Psychic test, the psyker immediately suffers Perils of the Warp. The psyker suffers D3 mortal wounds. If the psyker is taken out of action by Perils of the Warp, the power they were attempting to manifest automatically fails and each model within 3" immediately suffers D3 mortal wounds.
Wound Roll
If an attack scores a hit, you will then need to roll another dice to see if the attack wounds the target. The roll required is determined by comparing the attacking weapon’s Strength characteristic with the target’s Toughness characteristic, as shown on the following table:

WOUND ROLL
ATTACK’S STRENGTH VS TARGET’S TOUGHNESSD6 ROLL REQUIRED
Is the Strength
TWICE (or more)
than the Toughness?
2+
Is the Strength
GREATER
than the Toughness?
3+
Is the Strength
EQUAL
to the Toughness?
4+
Is the Strength
LOWER
than the Toughness?
5+
Is the Strength
HALF (or less)
than the Toughness?
6+


If the roll is equal to or greater than the required number, the attack succeeds and the attack sequence continues. If the roll is less than the required number, the attack fails and the attack sequence ends. An unmodified wound roll of 1 always fails and an unmodified wound roll of 6 is always successful.
Saving Throw
The player controlling the target model then makes a saving throw by rolling a D6 and modifying the roll by the Armour Penetration characteristic of the attacking weapon. For example, if the attacking weapon has an Armour Penetration of -1, then 1 is subtracted from the saving throw. If the result is equal to, or greater than, the Save characteristic of the target model, then the damage is prevented and the attack sequence ends. If the result is less than the model’s Save characteristic, then the saving throw fails and the model suffers damage. An unmodified saving throw of 1 always fails.
Falling Back
When you pick a model to move, if that model started the Movement phase within 1" of an enemy model, it cannot make a normal move. Instead, it can either remain stationary or Fall Back. A model cannot Fall Back if an enemy model finished a charge move within 1" of it in the same phase. If you choose to Fall Back, the model can move a distance equal to or less than its Move characteristic, but must end its move more than 1" away from all enemy models. If a model Falls Back, it cannot Advance, charge, React or be Readied in that phase. A model that Falls Back also cannot shoot later that battle round unless it can FLY. If you have Kill Team tokens, place a Fall Back token next to the model as a reminder.
ASSAULT

Assault weapons fire so rapidly or indiscriminately that they can be shot from the hip as warriors dash forwards into combat.

You can choose to shoot with a model with an Assault weapon in the Shooting phase (or React with that model to fire Overwatch) even if it Advanced earlier in that battle round. If it does so, it can only fire Assault weapons, and you must subtract 1 from any hit rolls made when firing that weapon this battle round.
RAPID FIRE

Rapid Fire weapons are capable of single aimed shots at long range and controlled bursts at close quarters.

A model firing a Rapid Fire weapon doubles the number of attacks it makes if all of its targets are within half the weapon’s Range characteristic.
GRENADE

Grenades are handheld explosive devices that a warrior throws at the enemy while their squad mates provide covering fire.

A model in your kill team armed with a Grenade weapon may fire it in Overwatch or in the Shooting phase. If they do so, they cannot fire any other weapons that phase, and no other model in your kill team can fire a Grenade weapon that phase.
PISTOL
Pistols are carried one-handed and can even be used in a melee to shoot at point-blank range.
You can choose to shoot with a model with a Pistol weapon even if there are enemy models within 1", but it must target the closest enemy model (you can choose which if two or more are equidistant) and can only shoot with its Pistol weapon(s). In such circumstances, the model can shoot its Pistol even if other friendly models are within 1" of the same enemy model. It cannot fire a Pistol if it was charged in this battle round.

Each time a model armed with both a Pistol and another type of ranged weapon (e.g. a Pistol and a Rapid Fire weapon) is chosen to shoot, it can either shoot with its Pistol(s) or with all of its other weapons. Choose which it will fire (Pistols or non-Pistols) before making hit rolls.
Nerve Tests
You must take a Nerve test for each of your models that has a flesh wound, and for your other models if your kill team is broken. To take a Nerve test for a model, roll a D6 and apply the following cumulative modifiers:

NERVE TEST MODIFIERS
Each other friendly model that is shaken or is out of action+1
Each other friendly model (other than shaken models) within 2" of the model-1

If the result of the Nerve test exceeds the model’s Leadership characteristic, the test is failed. The model is shaken, and cannot do anything until it is no longer shaken: place a Shaken token next to it. Otherwise, the test is passed. The test is always passed on an unmodified roll of 1.
Invulnerable Saves
Some models possess abilities or wargear, such as supernatural reflexes or force fields, that grant them an invulnerable save. Each time you are required to make a save roll for a model with an invulnerable save, you can choose to use either its normal Save characteristic or its invulnerable save, but not both. If you use a model’s invulnerable save, it is never modified (e.g. by a weapon’s Armour Penetration characteristic or by the Survivor ability) unless the modifier explicitly applies to invulnerable saves. If a model has more than one invulnerable save, it can only use one of them – choose which it will use.
Hammer of Wrath
Models that charged in this battle round fight before all other models. Players take it in turn to choose a model that charged from their kill team to fight with (see below), or pass, in the order determined in the Initiative phase. If a player passes, it is the next player’s turn to choose. A player cannot choose to pass if they have a model that charged that can fight. Once all players have chosen a model from their kill team or passed, they do so again in the same order, until all players pass in succession. When they do so, the Hammer of Wrath section of the Fight phase is over.
Pile In
You may move the model up to 3" – the model must end the move closer to the nearest enemy model.
Melee
Each time a model makes a close combat attack, it uses a melee weapon – the weapons a model is armed with are listed on its datasheet. In addition to the melee weapons listed on their datasheets, all models are also assumed to be able to fight with a close combat weapon, which has the following profile:

WEAPONRANGETYPESAPD
Close combat weaponMeleeMeleeUser01

If a model has more than one melee weapon, choose which it will use before rolling the dice. If a model has more than one melee weapon and can make several close combat attacks, it can split its attacks between these weapons however you wish – declare how you will divide the attacks before any dice are rolled.
Consolidate
You may move the model up to 3" – the model must end the move closer to the nearest enemy model.
© Vyacheslav Maltsev 2013-2020