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On the following pages, you will find advice that will help you create and fight exciting narrative battles. We will provide guidance on how to set up a narrative battle, and you will find examples of the rules and battleplans we have used in our own narrative games.


Introducing Narrative Play

There are already many great resources for narrative play, and more are coming all the time. The Realmgate Wars series of books are a great example of this, and they provide a perfect jumping-off point for anyone interested in recreating events from that tumultuous period of the Age of Sigmar. The stories set out in the various Warhammer Age of Sigmar publications are there to provide more than just a setting for your collections of Citadel Miniatures. Some of these tales are about specific individuals, like the famous Vandus Hammerhand of the Hammers of Sigmar, while some tell the story of entire battles. All of them, however, can provide inspiration for games you might want to play.

These books often contain battleplans that allow you to play narrative games based on the tales you read there. Recreating a battle just as it happened in the narrative is great fun, and as we’ve already created many battleplans that do this, it’s very easy as well. Simply choose a story you wish to recreate and play the battleplan associated with it.

With only a little effort, however, it is just as satisfying to use those battleplans as frameworks for making up your own stories, tailored particularly to your own model collections. You can even create entirely new battleplans to tell stories of your own.

Planning a Narrative Game

Planning a narrative game is often just as fun as playing the game itself, as it lets you really unleash your imagination. Maybe you’re battling it out in the Realm of Beasts where the land itself is alive. Angered by the presence of strange armies, it shakes and ruptures, causing earthquakes, landslides and buildings to crash down upon those who venture across it. Once you’ve conjured up an idea for a battleplan, you can work out where your forces will fight and the aspects of that environment which could help or hinder the warring parties. The battleground could be a mountain range caught in a magicdraining blizzard or a barren plain blasted with scorching desert winds. Perhaps you wish to play out the story of an epic siege, recreating the daring actions of the invading force bringing down the battlements, or the stoic defenders standing strong against the onslaught. You can use any of the optional rules in this book and other Warhammer Age of Sigmar publications to give tactical significance to these story elements.

Whether you aspire to play a straightforward clash to destroy your opponent’s army or you want to try out something more creative, such as casting down the arcane idols of your dark foes, there are some questions that should be addressed before you take to the field of battle. Existing battleplans routinely answer these questions for you, but if you want to invent your own battleplan you’ll need to work them out for yourself. Follow a step-by-step guide to creating your own battleplan from scratch, and these same instructions can be used to write a battleplan that incorporates all the narrative elements you want. You can tailor each part of the battleplan to the story, from the armies included to the objectives being fought for, from the location of the battle to how the victory conditions are determined.

For example, you could recreate one of the battles fought on Decrepita in the Realm of Life, where Nagash sent his legions to steal the land from Alarielle’s people. The armies could include Sylvaneth on one side, and Nighthaunt, Deathrattle and Deadwalker units on the other. You could use the Realm of Battle rules for Ghyran, and write a special rule to represent the seemingly endless hordes of undead that besieged the isle. Whatever story you want to tell, the rules to recreate it on the tabletop are at your fingertips.

Making your own battleplans, special rules and creatures is heady stuff, but be warned that it’s not for everyone. Some players prefer to keep their games within the remit of the published rules, so it is vital to ensure that your opponent is happy to play with any bespoke rules you have created. While you may have built your own mighty monolith to the Dark Gods and come up with some great rules to go along with it, just as importantly you’ll need to find an opponent that wants to fight a battle using your creation on the table. Springing such an invention onto an opponent expecting a matched play battle probably won’t go down well. Setting up such a game as a special occasion will work better. In fact, clubs or gaming groups sometimes put on extravagant and highly themed games, on occasion even taking them to show off at major events such as Games Workshop’s Warhammer Fest.

Games Masters

One of the best ways to introduce new rules or a bespoke battleplan into a game is with the help of a games master. A games master (or GM for short) is an optional figure who can preside over and run a particular battle. The GM helps the players by setting up the battleplan and interpreting – or even making up – the rules as needed.

Games masters offer fantastic opportunities for Warhammer Age of Sigmar players to vary their games. GMs are a neutral party who can coordinate any number of entertaining gaming options, such as an unexpected ambush. Just like real commanders, the players won’t know where their enemy is (or in some cases, what their enemy is). Imagine a battle interrupted by a monster disturbed by fighting too close to its lair, or the sudden realisation that the ruined altars atop the hills still contain great power. Having a games master can put the players into the shoes of a ‘real’ general and offers great scope for creating battlefields where nothing can be taken for granted. Hidden objectives, secret agendas amongst players, and competitive rivalries between allies are all battleplan rules best coordinated by a GM.

A games master is not to be confused with a tournament umpire, who is there to act as an adjudicator in rules disputes. Being a games master should be more about incorporating creative ideas and elements into a game without upsetting the competitive balance of the rules than double-checking whether a unit is eligible to charge an opponent. The role of a GM is more to do with creating an immersive and interactive environment in which battles can take place, and ensuring the game runs smoothly.

If you are interested in coming up with new battleplan ideas, rules twists or ideas for new creature types then try making up a game for your gaming group. It is a good idea to stick to armies you or your friends have, and add a few creative touches, such as a new terrain feature, battleplan special rules or a specially created monster. Even rigid, by-thebook players are more comfortable with new rules mechanics when the game is presided over by a GM. Their presence should ensure balance, as the game won’t be dominated by one player over-eager to try out their new modelling project. The key to being a great GM is to remain fair and impartial, while at the same time ensuring all the players have a fantastic time.

The Realmgate Wars

If you’re looking for narrative games to play, The Realmgate Wars series is the perfect place to start. Replete with gripping stories and dynamic rules, these four books provide all you need to recreate the fateful battles of this era on the tabletop.

Each battleplan in these books represents a part of this epic narrative, but can also be adapted to suit similar scenarios in which different armies clash together. This means that whatever models you have in your collection, and whatever stories you’d like to tell, these battleplans can be easily modified to suit.

As well as battleplans, each of these books includes one or more sets of Time of War rules. These allow you to recreate some of the wondrous and terrifying environs discovered by the armies that fought in these battles. With rules representing many of the famed regions in which these conflicts took place, along with the incredible creatures and natural wonders of the realms that played their part in these encounters, these rules offer a plethora of tools for turning these and other stories into narrative games of Warhammer Age of Sigmar.

The combined content of these tomes provides narrative gamers with a wide range of inspirational ideas that you can use either straight from the pages, or adapt to create narrative battles of your own devising.

Historical Battles

On the following pages, you will find advice that will help you create and fight exciting narrative battles. We will provide guidance on how to set up a narrative battle, and you will find examples of the rules and battleplans we have used in our own narrative games.

The Mortal Realms are rich with legend, with events of great magnitude casting their shadows long over the aeons that follow, storied heroes rising at moments of strife to wrest power from the forces of Chaos, and figures of darkness manipulating fate to serve their own agendas. This vast and ever-unfolding tapestry of history is a mine of inspiration for your narrative games.

You can find exciting tales in any of our publications, from campaign books to Black Library novels. You might find a whole chapter dedicated to a battle you want to recreate in your games, or it might be just a brief mention in the pages of White Dwarf that grabs your attention. Crossed swords on maps mark the sites of past battles, their names receding into legend. Artwork provides a window into the Mortal Realms, offering astounding details that can be translated to tabletop games. The annals of the Age of Sigmar are filled with such material, a treasure trove of clashes between great armies, and the meeting of gods, heroes and monsters in battle.

Recreating the legendary battles from the history of the Mortal Realms is, for many, the pinnacle of narrative gaming. Fashioning rules that recreate the circumstances of such a monumental clash can be a truly satisfying exercise, and collecting and painting the fabled heroes and armies that fought in it is, for many, a hugely rewarding project.

Furthermore, the epic grandeur of these events makes for a really thrilling game, imbued with all the gravitas of these epoch-defining moments. However, in your games things might not unravel in the same way as history tells it – the hand of fate might intervene, reversing the fortunes of all involved, or your own strategic skills could turn the tide of battle at the last. Many players enjoy challenging history in this way, determining how they would fare in the shoes of the heroes and warlords that feature in these stories.

As was covered on the previous pages, there are a number of ways you can recreate a story from the Mortal Realms. Often there will be a battleplan that accompanies the story that you can play right away. Other times you may need to adapt a similar battleplan or create a new one. There is no right or wrong method for doing this, as long as all players agree beforehand. If you want to recreate an event accurately, this involves doing some research to learn the details of the battle, such as the size, disposition and appearance of the armies, which notable heroes were present, where the battle took place and how long it raged for. Special rules can be written to represent the unique situation of the battle you’re fighting, and where such information is not available, you can use your imagination to fill in the blanks.

You can spend time tailoring your collection of Citadel Miniatures to represent a particular army at a particular period in time, taking them through each of the milestone battles that moulded their fate. You can take pains to ensure the terrain matches the description of the region in which each battle took place, representing as best you can that fabled site. Ultimately, the more details you discover or create about the armies, terrain, strategies and special circumstances that were involved, the more enjoyable your historical battles will be. Designing rules, army lists and a modelled battlefield is all part of the fun.

On the following pages you will find an example of a historical battle that we have played, which you can use as inspiration for your own games. It recreates the events depicted in The Realmgate Wars: Quest for Ghal Maraz, in which Lord-Celestant Vandus Hammerhand of the Hammers of Sigmar at last seized the God-King’s fabled hammer from the claws of Kairos Fateweaver and his coven of Tzeentchian sorcerers. Opposite, you can read the thrilling story of this crucial battle, and overleaf you can find out what happened when we took it to the tabletop!

To replay this pivotal moment, we assembled two armies, one of Stormcast Eternals, another of Lords of Change and their minions. Vandus Hammerhand and Kairos Fateweaver are each represented by their own models and warscrolls, while their armies are made up of models taken from the Stormcast Eternals and Disciples of Tzeentch ranges. Read on to see how we went about recreating this crucial battle…

Campaigns in the Mortal Realms

Campaigns weave individual narrative play games together in an unfolding story. Each chapter of the story affects the one that follows, creating a truly immersive gaming saga. Providing scope to tell epic tales that involve numerous different battles, campaigns are ideal for expanding your narrative play experience.

If you feel like you want to take your narrative gaming to the next level, creating a campaign is a great way to start. By connecting games together, both with rules and with an over-arching narrative, you can engage in an even more immersive form of gaming. There are various mechanisms you can use to connect your games, some of which are explained here.

A campaign can be as extensive as you like, from a few battles between two players, to sprawling epic conflicts that involve your entire gaming group. For instance, you could pitch your army against that of a friend and spend a day playing a short campaign that encompasses a skirmish, an epic main battle and a desperate last stand. Alternatively, you can get a group of players involved in a campaign that lasts for weeks, or even months, before it comes to its epic conclusion. Campaigns like this are great motivators for developing an army, inspiring players to collect, build and paint new miniatures for each encounter.

If you’re new to campaigning, it’s best to start small. A set of connected battles with a manageable objective such as capturing a Realmgate is ideal. Once you have developed a taste for campaigning, you can make use of increasingly complex systems. Campaigns can develop into huge multiplayer battles where pacts are formed and armies expand as the sagas unfold. In fact, stories are at the heart of every successful narrative campaign, and when combined with a sound framework and organisation, they provide the excitement and interest that keeps everyone motivated to win.

Linked Battle Campaigns

One of the simplest campaign formats, linked battle campaigns are literally just a string of battles connected together in a linear fashion. The outcome of each battle affects the scenario for the next, allowing you to create realistic plots that develop over time. It’s only a short step from planning a story for one game to planning a story that extends across several. As the campaign goes on, a narrative arc will naturally form. Grudges will be established, vows of redemption will be sworn, heroic characters will show their worth.

For example, the objective of the first battle might be to secure a sacred relic. In the second battle, the losing army will challenge the victor to a rematch, but this time the army in possession of the relic benefits from its magical powers! Linking games together like this presents new and exciting tactical challenges. Players must consider the bigger picture in every decision they make, and remember that it is possible to lose a battle and still win the war.

The scope for linked battle campaigns is practically endless. Here’s another example: Two regular gaming opponents agree to play a linked battle campaign. They decide the first game will be an ambush, with a Bloodbound pack surprising a Fyreslayers army on its way to a larger battle. Any models that survive this initial skirmish can take part in the second battle, a conflict between two larger armies, in which the survivors from game one arrive as reinforcements in the second battle round. If a ten-model strong unit of Vulkite Berzerkers suffers four casualties during the course of game one, then in the following game, the Fyreslayers player can add the unit of six surviving Vulkite Berzerkers to their army as reinforcements.

Even in this simple example, each battle presents interesting tactical decisions. A timely retreat in the first game might serve you well in the second when you will have more models with which to bolster your forces. Likewise, any enemies you let slip through your net will rally for the next encounter, so it’s best to destroy them while you have the chance!

The boons offered to victorious players in the second and subsequent battles can vary enormously. Extra models to fight with, a deployment advantage, an opportunity to recruit a deadly monster, set up the terrain or even choose the next battleplan are all ideas you can try out. But ensure that these devices make the next battle more enjoyable, not less – both sides need to have a solid opportunity to win. If the odds are stacked too far in favour of one player, the game won’t be much fun for either side.

Linked games provide even more opportunities when set up and run by a games master. A GM can add impromptu links and new rules as the battle rages. For instance, if a unit suffers grievous damage but boldly holds on, the GM might grant the survivors a special ability to reflect their hatred of their foes for the next battle. With all these possibilities, linked battle campaigns provide countless ways to enhance, expand and personalise your narrative games.

Map Campaigns

Map campaigns provide a dynamic geographical setting for your battles, which you can explore and conquer as the campaign progresses.

Map campaigns are set within a particular collection of locations, with each battle allowing players to invade and capture the territories on the map. In any map campaign, the outcome of each battle determines who occupies a designated region. A battle is fought for each territory, using a battleplan that’s appropriate for the area – or your own rules if you wish – with the winner planting their flag in that location.

The outcome of the campaign is determined by the number of territories that are controlled. The winner is usually whoever first wins control of a pre-agreed number of areas, or the player that controls the most after a set number of turns. Structuring your campaign around a map makes it even more immersive, as you are able to visualise where your army is fighting, where the campaign might take you and how rival armies are faring.

If you are inspired by a map you have found in a Warhammer Age of Sigmar book, you can adopt it for use in your own campaign. Equally, there’s real joy to be had in drawing your own maps. A map can be a simple line drawing, a three dimensional gameboard, or anything in between. Collaborating on a design with other members of your group can be a rewarding experience in itself.

Raise the stakes by setting the players objectives that must be achieved in each location, or giving the armies accumulating benefits for winning territories. You can even create special rules for the various locations on the map that activate when an army arrives there. Realm of Battle rules really come into their own here, as they are great ways to represent different environments.

We’ve included an example of a campaign map here, which you can use as a framework for your own campaign.

Tree Campaigns

Tree campaigns add a compelling level of complexity to narrative games. Like linked battle campaigns, each game in a tree campaign affects the next, but rather than a linear series of engagements, battles are organised by a previously drawn flow diagram – the eponymous ‘tree’. You will find an example of a tree campaign as follows.

Each time a battle is fought in a tree campaign, the tree diagram will indicate which game should be played next based on the outcome. Usually, the winner will have some sort of advantage in the next game, but it all depends on how your gaming group designs the tree.

For example, the simplest tree campaign could consist of just two battles. In the first, one army must hold its ground (the defender), while the other must assault it (the attacker). If the attacker wins, the next battle might present a scenario in which the defender’s depleted forces must fight a rearguard action while the rest of their army retreats. If the defender wins the first battle, the next might give the defender the opportunity to go on the offensive, forcing the attacker to fight a desperate last stand with a smaller force to account for the casualties suffered in the previous game.

There’s no fixed limit to the number of battles a tree campaign is made up of, but the longer a campaign is, the larger and more complex the diagram will need to be.

 

This map of the Flamescar Plateau is from the Season of War: Firestorm supplement. It’s a good example of the kind of map you can use in a campaign, and should serve as inspiration for maps of your own devising.


Beneath Skull Mountain

Here you will find a tree campaign for two players. To fight the campaign, all you need to do is read the introduction below and gather two armies, then follow the instructions for Death in the Dark for your first battle.

Introduction
Two rival warlords have established their strongholds near to each other. Their domains are separated from each other by a mountain chain that is riddled with a network of tunnels. Each warlord is determined to crush their rival, but in order to do so they will need to fight their way through the tunnels and across the open plains that lie beyond, before they can finally besiege their opponent’s stronghold.


Siege Warfare

Strongholds of all different shapes and sizes stud the Mortal Realms. Only a sizeable and highly motivated force has any chance of capturing such an objective and the spoils that lie beyond its walls, and then only at a terrible cost in blood and lives!

Assaulting a fortress is no small matter. Many have tall, strong walls which are covered with protective devices designed to punish any intrusion, and within the walls stand garrisons of staunch defenders ready to rain death upon any attackers. Others are naturally occurring, such as an area of densely forested woodland or a series of ancient and long-abandoned caves, that can be used by a cunning or desperate defender to provide cover and stem an enemy assault.

The following rules allow you to fight a battle where one player must assault an enemy stronghold, and one must defend it. Also included are two siege warfare battleplans for you to use with them. Imaginative players will find it easy to modify the following rules to fight other types of siege games.

The Stronghold

All Warhammer Age of Sigmar sieges require a stronghold for the defender to occupy. As noted above, the exact nature of a stronghold varies a great deal; it may be a Direstone Redoubt, a Sylvaneth Wyldwood or a set of ancient ruins. Because of this, the defender is given free reign to make their stronghold from any terrain features that they have available.

The siege warfare battleplan you choose for your game will let you know how to pick the attacker and the defender, and which of the two territories that they occupy at the start of the battle. Set up the scenery in the attacker’s territory and any neutral areas of the battlefield as normal, and then the defender can set up the scenery representing their stronghold in their territory.

The defender must set up at least five terrain features, and can set up any number more as long as all of the terrain features they set up fit fully inside their territory. You can choose any terrain features you like in your own games, or use the examples shown on these pages as inspiration.

The players set up their armies once the stronghold has been set up, following the set-up instructions from the battleplan they have decided to use.

The Siege Phase

The following siege phase takes place after the stronghold has been built and the armies set up, but before the first battle round begins. It represents the siege tactics that the attackers have used before the assault to wear down the defenders, and the counter-tactics the defenders have used to ensure they can hold out as long as possible.

There are three main methods a besieging army can use to wear down the defenders before the battle starts, each of which has a corresponding counter-tactic the defender can use against it:

Starve/Gather Supplies

The attackers isolate the stronghold, so that the defenders starve to death once their supplies begin to run out. The defender can counter this by gathering as many supplies as possible either before or during the siege.

Batter/Re-build

The attacker batters away at the defender’s stronghold. With luck, one or more sections of the stronghold will be breached, making it easier to attack. The defender can counter this by organising working parties to repair as much of the damage as possible.

Tunnel/Counter-tunnel

The attacker builds underground tunnels that will allow at least part of their army to emerge inside the defender’s stronghold. The defender can counter by building tunnels that intercept the attackers while they are still underground.To determine what effect these tactics have, the players must each pick a siege tactic and then determine any siege effects, as described next.

Siege Tactics

Both the attacker and defender must secretly pick one of the three siege tactics to concentrate their efforts on.

To decide what the attacker’s main siege method will be, and the counter-tactic used by the defender, each player secretly picks a number by hiding a dice behind their hand. The attacker must pick a number from 1 to 3, and the defender a number from 4 to 6.

Once both players have chosen their numbers, the dice are revealed, and the numbers cross-referenced on the siege table below, which will tell you what modifiers (if any) apply to the effects of the siege.

For example, the attacker chooses to concentrate upon starving the defenders, while the defender chooses to counter-tunnel. This means that 1 is added to the dice rolls the attacker makes to see if any of the defending units starve, and that 2 is subtracted from the attacker’s roll to see if they successfully dig a tunnel.

Siege Effects

Next, the attacker makes rolls to determine the effect of their siege methods on the defenders. Make all of the Starve rolls first, then the Batter rolls, and finally the Tunnel rolls.

Starve

The attacker rolls a dice for each defending unit, subtracting 1 from the roll if the unit is a HERO, and applying any of the relevant modifiers from the siege table. On a 5+ the unit suffers D3 mortal wounds.

Batter

The attacker rolls a dice for each terrain feature in the defender’s territory, applying any of the relevant modifiers from the siege table. On a 5+ the terrain feature has been breached, and none of its abilities can be used in the battle (it can still provide cover).

Tunnel

The attacker and the defender each roll a dice, the attacker applying any of the relevant modifiers from the siege table (the defender’s dice roll is never modified). If the attacker’s roll is higher, they have successfully completed their tunnel, and can pick one HERO and two other units (none of the units can contain models with the MONSTER or WAR MACHINE keyword that have a Wounds characteristic of 8 or more).

Any units sent into the tunnels are removed from the battlefield, and can emerge from the tunnels at the start of any of their movement phases. The attacker must first pick a point in the defender’s territory where the tunnel emerges. The units using the tunnel must then be set up wholly within 6" of the tunnel exit, and more than 3" from any enemy units. This counts as their move for that movement phase.

 

The Assault

Once all of the siege effects have been rolled for, the attacker’s assault begins. Start the first battle round of the game.

SIEGE TABLE
Defender’s Counter-tacticAttackers Main Siege Method
Starve (1)Batter (2)Tunnel (3)
Gather Supplies (4)-1 Starve+1 Batter
-1 Starve
+2 Tunnel
-1 Starve
Re-build (5)+1 Starve
-1 Batter
-1 Batter+2 Tunnel
-1 Batter
Counter-tunnel (6)+1 Starve
-2 Tunnel
+1 Batter
-2 Tunnel
-2 Tunnel

Siege Command Abilities

You can use the following command abilities in games that use the Siege rules. The attacker’s command abilities can only be used by the attacking army, and the defender’s command abilities can only be used by the defending army.

Attacker’s Command Abilities


Cry Havoc!

Warriors are ordered to attack no matter the cost.
You can use this command ability in the combat phase. If you do so, pick a friendly unit within 6" of a friendly HERO or 12" of your general. For the rest of that combat phase, add 1 to hit rolls and subtract 1 from save rolls for that unit.

Demolition Charges

Explosives are used to shatter enemy fortifications.
You can use this command ability in your hero phase. If you do so, pick a terrain feature that is within 3" of a friendly unit, and within 6" of a friendly HERO or 12" of your general. Roll a dice for each enemy unit garrisoning that terrain feature. On a 4+ that enemy unit suffers D3 mortal wounds.

Reinforcements

Fresh troops arrive to join the battle.
You can use this command ability in your hero phase. If you do so, roll a dice. On a 4+, pick a friendly unit from which all the models have been slain. You can set up the unit again, wholly within 6" of the edge of the battlefield and more than 9" from any enemy models. This counts as the unit’s move for the following movement phase.

Defender’s Command Abilities


Boiling Oil

Sizzling hot oil is poured upon attacking troops.
You can use this command ability in your hero phase. If you do so, pick a terrain feature that is garrisoned by a friendly HERO and at least five other friendly models. Roll a dice for each enemy unit within 3" of that terrain feature. On a 4+, that enemy unit suffers D3 mortal wounds.

Sally Forth

A hidden gateway is opened, allowing the defenders to mount a counter-attack.
You can use this command ability in your hero phase. If you do so, pick a terrain feature that is garrisoned by a friendly HERO. You can re-roll charge rolls in the following charge phase for any units that exit that terrain feature this turn.

Take Cover

Troops are ordered to make the maximum use of any cover.
You can use this command ability in the combat phase. If you do so, pick a friendly unit within 6" of a friendly HERO or 12" of your general. For the rest of that combat phase, add 1 to save rolls and subtract 1 from hit rolls for that unit.

 

Battleplan

The Relief Force

A defending army has been under siege for a considerable time. A relief force has been despatched to aid them, but before it can arrive the attackers launch their final assault. Can the garrison hold out until reinforcements arrive?

SIEGE WARFARE
Use the Siege Warfare rules.

SET-UP
The players roll off, and the winner decides who will be the attacker and who the defender. The territories for the attacking and defending armies are shown on the map below. The players then set up scenery (see The Stronghold).

Next, pick three different terrain features in the defender’s territory to be the attacker’s siege targets. The attacker picks the first terrain feature, the defender picks the second, and the attacker picks the third.

The armies can now be set up. The defender must set up their army first. The defending army is split into two contingents: the garrison and the relief force. There must be at least one unit in the relief force for each unit that is included in the garrison (the army general can be in either contingent). The defending player can only set up units from their garrison at the start of the battle – the relief force will arrive during the battle as described below. Defending units can be set up anywhere wholly within their territory.

The attacking army sets up second. Attacking units must be set up wholly within their territory, more than 6" from the defender’s territory.

THE RELIEF FORCE
Roll 2D6 at the start of each of the defender’s turns to see if the relief force arrives. Add the battle round number to the score. On a roll of 11 or more the entire relief force arrives. Roll a dice; on a roll of 1-2 it arrives on the narrow table edge to the right of the defender’s territory; on a roll of 3-4 it arrives on the table edge opposite the defender’s territory; and on a roll of 5-6 it arrives on the table edge to the left of the defender’s territory (see map).

Units from the relief force can enter play in their player’s movement phase. All of the models in the unit must be set up wholly within 6" of the table edge they arrive on, and more than 9" from any enemy units. This counts as their move for that movement phase.

SIEGE TARGETS
The siege targets in the defender’s territory are controlled by the last player to have any models in or on the terrain feature. If both players have models in or on a siege target, it is controlled by the defender.

GLORIOUS VICTORY
The game ends at the end of fifth battle round. The attacker wins a major victory if they have captured all three siege targets, and the defender wins a major victory if the attacker has control of just one or none of the siege targets. If the attacker controls two siege targets, the battle is a draw.


Battleplan

The Great Wall

An attacking army finds its path blocked by a massive wall. The only option is to lay siege to the stronghold in an effort to break through the defensive line.

SIEGE WARFARE
Use the Siege Warfare rules.

SET-UP
The players roll off, and the winner decides who will be the attacker and who the defender. The territories for the attacking and defending armies are shown on the map below. The players then set up scenery (see The Stronghold).

The armies can now be set up. The defender must set up their army first. The defending army is split into two contingents: the garrison and reinforcements. There must be at least one reinforcement unit for each unit that is included in the garrison (the army general can be in either contingent). The defending player can only set up units from their garrison at the start of the battle – reinforcements will arrive during the battle as described below. Defending units can be set up anywhere wholly within their territory.

The attacking army sets up second. Attacking units must be set up wholly within their territory, more than 6" from the defender’s territory.

REINFORCEMENTS
Starting from the second battle round, the defender must roll a dice for each of their reinforcement units at the start of their movement phase. On a roll of 5 or 6, the unit arrives on the battlefield.

All of the models in a reinforcement unit that arrives must be set up within 6" of the table edge, wholly within the defender’s reinforcement area as shown on the map, and more than 9" from any enemy units. This counts as their move for that movement phase. Set the unit up before rolling to see if the next reinforcement unit arrives.

GLORIOUS VICTORY
This battle is fought to control two objectives. One objective is located in the centre of the defender’s territory, and the second in the centre of the defender’s reinforcements area, as shown on the map below.

The battle ends at the end of the fifth battle round. The attacker wins a major victory if they control both objectives. The defender wins a minor victory if they control one of the objectives, and a major victory if they control both. Any other result is a draw.


Darkest Depths

The landscapes of the Mortal Realms are often riddled with subterranean tunnels and caverns. Frantic battles are often fought to control these darkened passageways, turning the underground world into a battlefield that is just as bloody as any found on the surface.

Desperate battles are fought in gloom and darkness, the only light coming from flickering torches or the luminescent glow of subterranean fungus. Footing can be treacherous, with unexpected drops that can doom the unwary, while loose rocks or stalactites suddenly fall from the ceiling, crushing anyone unfortunate enough to be standing below. Last but far from least, underground realms are home to all manner of creatures, most of which are ferocious predators.

Commanding an army in such treacherous conditions calls for a special set of skills and stoic fortitude. It is very difficult to deploy an army in formation in any but the very largest caverns, and usually the battle will take place as a series of bloody skirmishes, each fought individually in scattered tunnels or caves. In such conditions it is hard to provide support for an embattled unit, and warriors will have to rely on their own strength of arm to defeat a foe, even if they are heavily overmatched.

A general must do their best to be at the right place at the right time, judging through intuition and experience where the fighting will be most desperate, and throwing themselves into the fray at this point in order to ensure victory.

Darkest Depths Rules

Darkest Depths introduces several new rules to help you fight battles below the surface of the Mortal Realms. These recreate the dark and dangerous underground environs, where cave-ins and pitfalls are everpresent dangers and where hungry monsters lurk in the gloom awaiting to attack the unwary.

The following rules can be used with the Tunnel Wars and Underground Ambush battleplans, or in underground battles of your own devising.

Gloom and Darkness

The range of missile weapons and spells is limited to a maximum of 12".

Low Ceilings

Models cannot fly in battles that use the Darkest Depths rules, unless both players agree to designate certain areas of the battlefield as having ceilings that are high enough for them to do so.

Walls of Solid Rock

When you set up the battlefield you can nominate some of the terrain features to be walls of solid rock. These reach from the ground to the ceiling of the tunnel complex, and therefore cannot be moved across by any models.

Monstrous Denizen

Roll off after preparing the battlefield but before territories have been selected. The winner can choose to set up a MONSTER, if a suitable model that is not part of either army is available.

The monstrous denizen can be set up anywhere on the battlefield. Roll off to see which player controls the monstrous denizen at the start of each battle round. The winner of the roll-off treats the monstrous denizen as a unit from their army for that battle round. They can choose to attack the monster when it is part of their army if they wish to do so, but if they do, it joins the opposing army until the end of the battle round.

Unstable Surroundings

Roll a dice at the start of each of your hero phases. On a roll of 6, the commotion of battle has either caused a cave-in or stalactites to fall from the ceiling (you can choose which).

Cave-in

Pick a point anywhere on the battlefield that is more than 3" from any models or terrain features. That point is where the cave-in took place. For the rest of the battle, no models can move or be set up within 3" of that point.

Falling Stalactites

Pick D3 different enemy units. Roll a dice for each unit you pick. On a roll of 4+ the unit suffers a mortal wound. On a roll of 6+ it suffers D3 mortal wounds instead.

Command Abilities

You can use the following command abilities in games using the Darkest Depths rules in addition to the command abilities that you are normally allowed to use.

Hazardous Traps

Sabotage is a common tactic used by those wishing to eradicate unwary opponents.
You can use this command ability in your hero phase. If you do so, pick an enemy unit within 6" of a friendly HERO or 12" of your general. That unit is struck by falling stalactites, as described in the Unstable Surroundings rule. You can use this command ability in addition to the Unstable Surroundings rule.

Hidden Tunnel

The depths reward those who study the ancient byways of the subterranean realms.
You can use this command ability in your hero phase. If you do so, you can pick a friendly unit within 6" of a friendly HERO or 12" of your general. The unit you pick can move through walls of solid rock in your following movement phase, as long as no models in the unit finish the move in an area of solid rock.

Tame the Raging Beast

Those who brave these nether-realms often earn the loyalty of the creatures that dwell there.
You can use this command ability in your hero phase. If you do so, pick one monstrous denizen (see the Monstrous Denizens rule) within 3" of a friendly HERO. You control that monstrous denizen for the rest of the battle round. This can allow a monstrous denizen to take two turns in the same battle round.

Battleplan

Tunnel Wars

Countless battles have been fought to control the tunnel networks that twist and turn below the surfaces of each Mortal Realm. Such conflicts are usually fought as a series of bitter encounters in near-total darkness, with no quarter either asked or given.

DARKEST DEPTHS
Use the Darkest Depths rules.

Designer’s Note: Tunnel Wars is rather different to most battleplans, in that instead of fighting a single battle, you will divide your army into three contingents, and fight three separate battles using one of your contingents in each one. The three battles represent the most important of the battles taking place to gain control of a maze-like series of corridors and caverns.

THE ARMIES
Each player picks an army as described in the core rules, but then each player must split their army into three contingents. A single contingent may not have less than a quarter of the units in the army, or more than half of the units in the army.

Having selected contingents, the players must fight three battles using the following instructions, one after the other. Before setting up the armies for each of the three battles, the players must write down which of their three contingents they will use. Each contingent may only be used in one of the three battles, but they can be used in any order. Note that players should pick a general for each of their contingents at the start of each battle (one will represent the general, and the other two represent sub-commanders assigned by the general to lead the other contingents).

THE BATTLEFIELD
Set up terrain as described in the core rules. Each battle is being fought in underground tunnels and caverns, and appropriate terrain features should be used to represent the stygian depths where they take place.

Designer’s Note: Do not be put off playing this scenario if you lack terrain features that have a suitably subterranean appearance. An easy way to represent the tunnel complex is to cut out black or grey paper or cardboard into irregular shapes. These pieces can be used to represent solid rock walls, and placed on the battlefield to create a suitably mazelike set of tunnels and caverns.

SET-UP
The players roll off, and the winner decides which territory each side will use. The territories are shown on the map below.

The players then alternate setting up units one at a time, starting with the player that won the roll-off to determine territories. Units must be set up wholly within their own territory, more than 12" from enemy territory.

Continue to set up units until both players have set up their armies. If one player finishes first, the opposing player sets up the rest of the units in their army, one after another.

GLORIOUS VICTORY
You must slay all of the models in the opposing contingent to win each individual battle. At the end of the third battle, if one player won all three games, they win a major victory. If one player won two of the games, they win a minor victory.


Battleplan

Underground Ambush

In the darkened caverns below ground, it is possible to ambush an unwary opponent. The attackers will lurk in the darkness on the edges of a cavern that is commonly used as a route of passage, waiting for the foe to march through on their way to their destination. At a given command, the ambushers will spring from hiding, attacking the enemy from two directions at once.

DARKEST DEPTHS
Use the Darkest Depths rules.

THE ARMIES
Each player picks an army as described in the core rules, and then the players roll off. The winner is the ambusher, and the loser is the defender.

THE BATTLEFIELD
Set up terrain as described in the core rules. The battle is being fought in a large underground cavern, and appropriate terrain features should be used to represent the stygian depths where they take place.

SET-UP
The defender sets up first. All of their units must be set up in a column, facing in the same direction, wholly within 3" of the centre line of the battlefield.

The ambusher can set up their units anywhere wholly within 12" of either long edge of the battlefield. Units can be deployed on both sides of the defender’s army column if desired.

FIRST TURN
The ambusher has the first turn in the first battle round.

SURPRISE ATTACK
It is hard for the ambusher to coordinate an ambush, and difficult for the defender to respond. To represent this, each player must roll 2D6 before making a normal move with a unit in the first battle round. If the roll is greater than the unit’s Bravery characteristic, it may not move in that movement phase or attempt a charge in the charge phase.

GLORIOUS VICTORY
The battle continues until one player has no units left on the battlefield, or at the end of the fifth battle round should this occur sooner.

Wiping out the opposing army does not guarantee victory – you must do so without letting your opponent cause more wounds than you inflict in return. When the battle ends, each player calculates a victory score by adding up the Wounds characteristics of all the models from the opposing army that were slain during the battle. If one player beats their opponent’s score by 50% or more, they can claim a major victory. Otherwise the defender can claim a minor victory.


Triumph & Treachery!

Several armies converge on the same battlefield, each determined to capture it for themselves. All are hated foes, and there can be only one winner. Each general must use their resources wisely, choosing the best time to make an alliance, and the best time to break it.

The Triumph & Treachery rules allow three or more players to take part in a multi-sided battle. Each player commands their own force and takes on all the other players involved to prove themselves the ultimate champion.

In this section we have included all the rules you need to play a Triumph & Treachery game, as well as two battleplans (Right of Conquest and Argument of Kings) designed to be used with these rules.

Triumph & Treachery games follow the core rules, with the following exceptions.

Rolling Off

Sometimes the players in a Triumph & Treachery battle will be required to roll off. To do so, all of the players roll a dice, and the player that rolls highest wins the roll-off. If several players are tied for the highest roll, the tied players roll off again, until only one player remains with the highest dice roll.

Determining Turn Order

A Triumph & Treachery battle has three or more sides. Because of this, all the players roll off at the start of each battle round (including the first battle round), and the winner decides which player will take the first turn. The player that has been chosen takes their turn, and then all of the remaining players roll off again, and the winner decides who will have the second turn. This carries on until there is only one player that has not yet taken a turn – that player takes their turn and the battle round is then over.

Player Turns

At the start of each phase, the player whose turn it is must pick one opponent to be their ‘enemy’ for that phase. A different enemy player may be selected in each phase if desired. When it’s your turn, picking the right opponent to attack in each phase is vital. You may want to attack two or more foes, but as you can only pick one, make sure you pick the right one!

Neutral Models

In games of Warhammer Age of Sigmar, models and units are either considered ‘friendly’ or ‘enemy’ – models in your army are friendly and models in your opponent’s army are enemy. In Triumph & Treachery battles, models and units can also be ‘neutral’.

Once you have chosen which player will be your enemy in a phase, all models in that player’s army are enemy models for all rules purposes for that phase.

All models belonging to any other players are neutral models, and cannot be affected by abilities or spells, or attacked in any way for that phase. Neutral units cannot use abilities.

Game Phases

The following rules apply, depending on which phase is being played:

Hero Phase

In your hero phase, only enemy models can unbind spells. Neutral models are never affected by spells, even if they are within the radius of effect of a spell.

Movement Phase

Treat neutral models as if they were enemy models in your movement phase (so you can’t move within 3" of them, must retreat if you want to move away from them, and so on).

Shooting Phase

In your shooting phase, only enemy units may be selected as the target of a shooting attack. Attacks that affect models within a certain distance of a target point do not affect neutral models.

Charge Phase

In your charge phase, the first model moved from a charging unit must finish the charge move within ½" of an enemy model.

Combat Phase

If your models are within 3" of models from any opposing armies at the start of the combat phase, then one of these armies must be chosen as the enemy. Attacks are only made between friendly models and enemy models.

Battleshock Phase

All units, including neutral units, have to take battleshock tests if they suffered casualties during the turn. You must still choose an enemy at the start of your battleshock phase, however, in case any of your models have any abilities that affect enemy models in this phase. Neutral players can use abilities that affect units from their own army in this phase.

Endless Spells

In Triumph & Treachery battles, predatory endless spells are moved after the first player had been determined, but before their turn takes place. The player to the left of the first player picks an endless spell to move, then the player to that player’s left moves a spell, and so on clockwise round the table until all predatory endless spells have been moved. A player must pick a predatory endless spell to move if any are available, but only predatory endless spells that have not yet moved can be chosen.

Victory Points

Victory points are used in Triumph & Treachery games both to determine the winner and as a form of currency that can be used to bribe other players.

You can keep track of your victory points (sometimes referred to as VPs) on a piece of paper, but it is much more fun to use coins or some other form of suitable marker. For example, you can use a small coin to represent 1 victory point, and a larger coin to represent 3 victory points, and so on.

The victory points a player has scored are not secret, and players are free to ask an opponent how many victory points they have at any time. At the end of a Triumph & Treachery battle, the player with the most victory points is the winner.

Bribery & Treachery

Players may give one or more of their command points and/or victory points to other players if they wish. For example, you can ‘pay’ a player a command point or a victory point not to attack you.

Note that deals and arrangements that are struck before any points are handed over are not binding, so be careful that you don’t give away any points to a player you cannot trust to honour their end of a deal – the name of the game is Triumph & Treachery, after all!

Secret Objectives (Optional)

SECRET OBJECTIVES
D6Secret ObjectiveVPs
1Secret Agenda: Your devious schemes have finally borne fruit.
Inflict 1 or more wounds on a unit from the army of the player that set up on your right or your left.
1 VP
2Pick on the Weak: Crush your enemies when they are at their most vulnerable.
Inflict 1 or more wounds on a unit from the army of a player that has fewer victory points than you.
1 VP
3Retribution: Revenge is a dish best served in blood!
Inflict 1 or more wounds on a unit from the army of the player that last chose you as an enemy.
2 VP
4Counter-attack: The time has come for you to fight back.
Inflict 1 or more wounds on a unit from the army of a player that has more victory points than you, or the same number of victory points as you.
2 VP
5Topple: Sometimes you must risk attacking a mighty foe.
Inflict 1 or more wounds on a unit from the army of the player that has the most victory points.
3 VP
6Kingslayer: Kill the upstart ruler that dared to insult you.
Slay the general of an opposing player’s army.
3 VP
If all of the players agree, you can use the following Secret Objectives rules in your games of Triumph & Treachery. If you decide to do so, every player is given a secret objective, and will earn extra victory points if they can achieve it.

The players must determine their secret objective at the start of the game, before the armies are set up. To do so, each player needs to secretly roll a dice, hiding the roll from the rest of the players (we recommend using a mug or tumbler to hide the dice roll), and consult the table below.

Where the objective requires you to inflict 1 or more wounds on a unit from a certain player’s army, the wound(s) must be inflicted by an attack, spell or ability used by a unit from your army, and can be a mortal wound.

When the objective is achieved, reveal the hidden dice to the other players, and score the appropriate number of victory points (VPs). Alternatively, a player can spend 1 command point in their hero phase to discard their current secret objective. In either of these cases, generate a new secret objective in the same way.

Battleplan

Right of Conquest

The battlefield is a vital piece of land that lies between several kingdoms. Each kingdom insists that the land is theirs, and theirs alone.

TRIUMPH AND TREACHERY!
This is a Triumph & Treachery battle for three to six players. Use Triumph & Treachery rules.

SET-UP
The players roll off, and the winner decides the order in which the players pick their territories. The territories for the armies are shown on the map below.

The players then alternate setting up units one at a time, starting with the player that won the roll-off. Units must be set up wholly within their own territory, more than 12" from any enemy models, and more than 6" from the centre of the battlefield. Continue to set up units until all players have set up their armies.

If a player desires, they may place any of their units in reserve instead of setting it up on the battlefield. Reserve units can enter play in any of their player’s movement phases starting from the second battle round. All of the models in the unit must be set up in the player’s starting territory, wholly within 6" of the table edge, and more than 9" from any enemy models. This counts as their move for that movement phase.

THE TIME IS NIGH!
Roll a dice at the end of each battle round, starting from the end of the fourth battle round. If the dice roll is equal to or more than the number of players taking part in the battle, the battle continues. If the dice roll is less than the number of players taking part in the battle, the battle ends and the winner is determined.

GLORIOUS VICTORY
The player with the most victory points at the end of the battle wins a major victory. In the case of a tie, each tied player wins a minor victory.

VICTORY POINTS
Victory points are scored as follows:

If a player achieves a secret objective, they gain the relevant number of victory points.

1 victory point is scored in each phase for every 5 wounds you inflicted in that phase.

At the end of the battle, each player scores D3 victory points for each territory in which one of their models is closer to the centre of the territory than any models belonging to the other players. If several players have models equally close to the centre of the territory, each scores 1 victory point.


Battleplan

Argument of Kings

А battleground stands where the borders of several kingdoms meet. The rulers of the kingdoms are determined to keep their borders secure, while stealing as much territory as they can.

TRIUMPH AND TREACHERY!
This is a Triumph & Treachery battle for three to six players. Use Triumph & Treachery rules.

SET-UP
The players roll off, and the winner decides the order in which the players pick their territories. The territories for the armies are shaded on the map below.

The players then alternate setting up units one at a time, starting with the player that won the roll-off. Units must be set up wholly within 12" of the centre of a table edge or a corner, as shown on the map below. Continue to set up units until all players have set up their armies.

If a player desires, they may place any of their units in reserve instead of setting them up on the battlefield. Reserve units can enter play in any of their player’s movement phases starting from the second battle round. All of the models in the unit must be set up in the player’s starting territory, wholly within 6" of the table edge, and more than 9" from any enemy models. This counts as their move for that movement phase.

GLORIOUS VICTORY
The player with the most victory points at the end of the fifth battle round wins a major victory. In the case of a tie, each tied player wins a minor victory.

VICTORY POINTS
Victory points are scored as follows:

If a player achieves a secret objective, they gain the relevant number of victory points.

1 victory point is scored in each phase for every 5 wounds you inflicted in that phase.

At the end of each turn, the player whose turn is taking place scores 3 victory points if there are no enemy models wholly within their starting territory. They score D3 additional victory points for each other territory that only has their models wholly within it (including any territories that were not used by a player at the start of the battle).


Path to Glory

Path to Glory campaigns centre around collecting and fighting battles with a warband in the Age of Sigmar. Champions fight each other and gather followers to join them in their quest for glory, taking advantage of this age of unending battle to win glory and renown.

In order to take part in a Path to Glory campaign, you will need two or more players. All players will need to have at least one HERO, who is their champion, and must then create a warband to follow and fight beside their champion during the campaign.

The players fight battles against each other using the warbands they have created. The results of these battles will gain their warband favour. The warband will swell in numbers as more warriors flock to their banner, while existing troops become more powerful.

After gaining enough favour or growing your warband enough to dominate all others through sheer weight of numbers, you will be granted a final test. Succeed, and your glory will be affirmed for all time, and you will be crowned as the victor of the campaign.

Creating a Warband

When creating a Path to Glory warband, do not select your army in the normal manner. Instead, your army consists of a mighty champion battling to earn the favour of the gods, and their entire band of loyal followers. As you wage war against other warbands, your own warband will grow, and existing units will become grizzled veterans.

Warband Roster

The details and progress of each warband need to be recorded on a warband roster, which you can download for free from here.

To create a warband, simply follow these steps and record the results on your warband roster:

  1. First, pick an allegiance for your warband. Each allegiance has its own set of warband tables that are used to generate the units in the warband and the rewards they can receive for fighting battles. Warhammer Age of Sigmar publications include warband tables to let you collect warbands from the Grand Alliances of Order, Chaos, Death and Destruction.
  2. Next, choose your warband’s champion by selecting one of the options from your allegiance’s champion table. The champion you choose will determine the number of followers in your warband. Give your champion a suitably grand name, and write this down on your warband roster.
  3. Having picked your champion, the next step is to generate your starting followers. These can be chosen from the followers tables for your allegiance. If your allegiance has more than one followers table you can freely choose which ones you use, selecting all of your followers from a single table or from several. Instead of choosing, you can place your destiny in the hands of fate and roll on the followers tables instead. To make a followers roll, pick a column from one of the followers tables and then roll a dice.
  4. Your followers need to be organised into units. The follower table tells you how many models the unit has. Follower units cannot include additional models, but they can otherwise take any options listed on their warscroll. Record all of the information about your followers on your warband roster.
  5. Instead of generating 1 unit of followers, your champion can start the campaign with a Champion’s Reward, or 1 of your units can start with a Follower’s Reward. No champion or unit can start the Path to Glory campaign with more than one reward each.
  6. Finally, give your warband a name, one that will inspire respect and dread in your rivals. Your warband is now complete, and you can fight your first battle. Good luck!

To War!

Having created a warband, you can now fight battles with it against other warbands taking part in the campaign. You can fight battles as and when you wish, and can use any of the battleplans available for Warhammer Age of Sigmar.

The units you use for a game must be those on your roster. Units can either be fielded at their full roster strength, or broken down into smaller units, as long as no unit is smaller than the minimum size shown on its warscroll.

Any casualties suffered by a warband are assumed to have been replaced in time for its next battle. If your champion is slain in a battle, it is assumed that they were merely injured, and they are back to full strength for your next game, thirsty for vengeance!

Gaining Glory

All of the players in the campaign are vying for glory. The amount of glory they have received is represented by the Glory Points that the warband has accumulated. Glory can be increased by fighting and winning battles, as described next. As a warband’s glory increases, it will also attract additional followers, and a warband’s champion may be granted rewards.

Warbands receive Glory Points after a battle is complete. If the warband drew or lost the battle, it receives 1 Glory Point. If it won the battle, it receives D3 Glory Points (re-roll a result of 1 if it won a major victory).

Add the Glory Points you scored to the total recorded on your roster. Once you have won 10 Glory Points, you will have a chance to win the campaign, as described below.

Rewards of Battle

Each allegiance has its own set of rewards tables. After each battle you can take one of the three following options. Alternatively, roll a D3 to determine which option to take:

D3Option
1Additional Followers: More followers flock to your banner. Either select a new unit or roll for a random one from a follower table, then add it to your warband roster. You can choose from any of your own follower tables, or from any of the follower tables from an allied warband table i.e. a warband table whose allegiance is from the same Grand Alliance as your own. In either case, if you wish to add a unit from a follower table that requires more than ‘1 roll’, you must also reduce your Glory Points total by 1 (if you do not have enough Glory Points, you cannot choose a unit from such a table). Once 5 new units have joined your warband, you will have a chance to win the campaign, as described below.
2Champion’s Reward: Your champion’s prowess grows. Roll on your allegiance’s champion rewards table. Note the result on your warband roster. If you roll a result the champion has already received, roll again until you get a different result.
3Follower’s Reward: Your warriors become renowned for mighty deeds. Pick a unit of followers (not one from an allied warband table), then roll on your allegiance’s followers rewards table. Note the result on your warband roster. If you roll a result the unit has already received, roll again until you get a different result.

Eternal Glory

There are two ways to win a Path to Glory campaign; either by Blood or by Might. To win by Blood your warband must first have 10 Glory Points. To win by Might your warband must have at least 5 additional units of followers. In either case, you must then fight and win one more battle to win the campaign. If the next battle you fight is tied or lost, you do not receive any Glory Points – just keep on fighting battles until you either win the campaign… or another player wins first!

You can shorten or lengthen a campaign by lowering or raising the number of Glory Points needed to win by Blood, or the number of extra units that must join a warband to win by Might. For example, for a shorter campaign, you could say that a warband only needs 5 Glory Points before the final fight, or for a longer one, say that 15 are needed.
Starve
The attacker rolls a dice for each defending unit, subtracting 1 from the roll if the unit is a HERO, and applying any of the relevant modifiers from the siege table. On a 5+ the unit suffers D3 mortal wounds.
Batter
The attacker rolls a dice for each terrain feature in the defender’s territory, applying any of the relevant modifiers from the siege table. On a 5+ the terrain feature has been breached, and none of its abilities can be used in the battle (it can still provide cover).
Tunnel
The attacker and the defender each roll a dice, the attacker applying any of the relevant modifiers from the siege table (the defender’s dice roll is never modified). If the attacker’s roll is higher, they have successfully completed their tunnel, and can pick one HERO and two other units (none of the units can contain models with the MONSTER or WAR MACHINE keyword that have a Wounds characteristic of 8 or more).

Any units sent into the tunnels are removed from the battlefield, and can emerge from the tunnels at the start of any of their movement phases. The attacker must first pick a point in the defender’s territory where the tunnel emerges. The units using the tunnel must then be set up wholly within 6" of the tunnel exit, and more than 3" from any enemy units. This counts as their move for that movement phase.
Mortal Wounds
Some attacks, spells and abilities inflict mortal wounds. Do not make hit, wound or save rolls for mortal wounds. Instead, the damage inflicted on the target is equal to the number of mortal wounds that were suffered. Allocate any mortal wounds that are caused while a unit is attacking at the same time as any other wounds caused by the unit’s attacks, after all of the unit’s attacks have been completed. Mortal wounds caused at other times are allocated to models in the target unit as soon as they occur, in the same manner as wounds caused by damage from an attack.

After they have been allocated, a mortal wound is treated in the same manner as any other wound for all rules purposes.
Cover
Add 1 to save rolls for a unit if all of its models are wholly on or within a terrain feature when the rolls are made. This modifier does not apply in the combat phase if the unit you are making save rolls for made a charge move in the same turn, and never applies to units containing models with the MONSTER or WAR MACHINE keyword that have a Wounds characteristic of 8 or more.
Command Abilities
If you have any HEROES in your army, you can use command abilities. Some command abilities are available to all armies, like the three on the right, while others are specific to certain models and appear on their warscroll. Some of these command abilities can only be used if that model is your general; when this is the case, it will be noted in the rules for the command ability.

In order to use any command ability you must spend 1 command point. You start the battle with 1 command point for each warscroll battalion you have in your army. In addition, you receive 1 command point at the start of each of your hero phases. You can use the same command ability several times in the same phase as long as you have enough command points to do so. Any command points you do not use can be used in a future turn. A command ability will usually specify when it is used; if it does not, it is used in your hero phase.
Modifiers
Sometimes modifiers apply to characteristics or abilities. For example, a rule might add 1 to a hit roll or the Move characteristic of a model. Modifiers are cumulative. Modifiers can never reduce a dice roll to less than 1.

If a modifier applies to a random value, work out the random value first and then apply the modifier(s) to it. For example, if an ability adds 1 to a Damage characteristic of D3, the result would be worked out by rolling the D3 and adding 1 to the roll.
Making Attacks
Attacks are resolved one at a time using the following attack sequence. In some cases, you can resolve all of the attacks made by the same type of weapon at the same time (see Multiple Attacks).

1.Hit Roll: Roll a dice. If the roll equals or beats the attacking weapon’s To Hit characteristic, then it scores a hit and you must make a wound roll. If not, the attack fails and the attack sequence ends. A hit roll of 1 before modification always fails to hit the target, and a hit roll of 6 before modification always hits the target.
2.Wound Roll: Roll a dice. If the roll equals or beats the attacking weapon’s To Wound characteristic, then it is successful and the opposing player must make a save roll. If not, then the attack fails and the attack sequence ends. A wound roll of 1 before modification always fails, and a wound roll of 6 before modification is always successful.
3.Save Roll: The opposing player rolls a dice, modifying the roll by the attacking weapon’s Rend characteristic. For example, if a weapon has a -1 Rend characteristic, then 1 is subtracted from the save roll. If the result equals or beats the Save characteristic of the models in the target unit, the save succeeds and the attack sequence ends without causing any damage. If not, the save fails and the attack is successful, and you must determine damage on the target unit. A save roll of 1 before modification always fails.
4.Determine Damage: Each successful attack inflicts damage on the target unit equal to the Damage characteristic of the weapon making the attack. Most weapons have a Damage characteristic of 1, but some have a Damage characteristic of 2 or more.
Roll-offs
Sometimes a rule may require the players to make a roll-off. When this is the case, each of the players rolls a dice, and whoever rolls highest wins the roll-off. If there is a tie for the highest roll, make the roll-off again. Neither player is allowed to re-roll or modify any of the dice when making a roll-off.
Missile Weapons
In order to attack with a missile weapon, the model using the weapon must be in range of the target unit (i.e. within the maximum distance, in inches, of the Range listed for the weapon making the attack), and the target unit must be visible to the model with the weapon (if unsure, stoop down and look from behind the shooting model to see if a model from the target unit is visible). For the purposes of determining visibility, a model can see through other models in its unit.

Some missile weapons have a Range characteristic with a minimum range, for example 6"-48". Such weapons cannot attack units that are wholly within the shorter range.
Casting and Unbinding Spells
A WIZARD can attempt to cast spells in its own hero phase. You cannot attempt to cast the same spell more than once in the same turn (even with a different wizard).

In order to cast a spell, first say which spell the wizard is going to attempt to use (it must be one they know). To cast the spell, roll 2D6. If the total is equal to or greater than the casting value of the spell, the spell is successfully cast.

If a spell is cast, the opposing player can choose one of their WIZARDS that is within 30" of the caster to attempt to unbind the spell before its effects are applied. To unbind a spell, roll 2D6. If the roll beats the roll used to cast the spell, then the spell is not successfully cast. Only one attempt can be made to unbind a spell.
Flying
If the warscroll for a model says that the model can fly, it can pass across models and terrain features as if they were not there when it makes any type of move. Any vertical distance up and/or down is ignored when measuring a flying model’s move. It cannot finish the move on top of another model.
Falling Stalactites
Pick D3 different enemy units. Roll a dice for each unit you pick. On a roll of 4+ the unit suffers a mortal wound. On a roll of 6+ it suffers D3 mortal wounds instead.
Normal Moves
Moves made in the movement phase are referred to as normal moves, to differentiate them from charge moves (made in the charge phase) and pile-in moves (made in the combat phase). A model making a normal move can move a distance in inches equal to or less than the Move characteristic shown on its warscroll.
© Vyacheslav Maltsev 2013-2019